Protein turnover and plant RNA and phosphorus requirements in relation to nitrogen fixation

John A. Raven

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    49 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol Pin the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol P in the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-35
    Number of pages11
    JournalPlant Science
    Volume188
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

    Cite this

    @article{828483a7bcf449df9fd81f3c55e6a4fd,
    title = "Protein turnover and plant RNA and phosphorus requirements in relation to nitrogen fixation",
    abstract = "Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1{\%} of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12{\%} of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol Pin the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1{\%} of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12{\%} of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol P in the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
    author = "Raven, {John A.}",
    year = "2012",
    month = "6",
    doi = "10.1016/j.plantsci.2012.02.010",
    language = "English",
    volume = "188",
    pages = "25--35",
    journal = "Plant Science",
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    Protein turnover and plant RNA and phosphorus requirements in relation to nitrogen fixation. / Raven, John A.

    In: Plant Science, Vol. 188, 06.2012, p. 25-35.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Protein turnover and plant RNA and phosphorus requirements in relation to nitrogen fixation

    AU - Raven, John A.

    PY - 2012/6

    Y1 - 2012/6

    N2 - Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol Pin the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol P in the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    AB - Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage Pin photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol Pin the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. Phosphorus (P) is the proximate (immediate) limiting element for primary productivity in some habitats, and is generally the ultimate limiting element for primary productivity. Although RNA can account for over half of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, some primary producers have more ribosomes than the minimum needed for the observed rate of net protein synthesis: some of this RNA may be needed for protein turnover. Two cases of protein turnover which can occur at a much faster rate than the bulk protein turnover are those of photodamaged photosystem II and O-2-damaged nitrogenase. While RNA involved in photosystem II repair accounts for less than 1% of the non-storage P in photosynthetic organisms, a maximum, of 12% of non-storage P could occur in RNA associated with replacement of damaged nitrogenase and/or O-2 damage avoidance mechanism in diazotrophic (N-2 fixing) organisms. There is a general trend in published data towards lower P use efficiency (g dry matter gain per day per mol P in the organism) for photosynthetic diazotrophic organisms growing under P limitation with N-2 as their nitrogen source, rather than with NH4+, urea or NO3-. Additional work is needed to examine the generality of a statistically verified decrease in P use efficiency for diazotrophic growth relative to growth on other nitrogen sources and, if this is confirmed, further investigation of the mechanism is needed. The outcome of such work would be important for relating the global distribution of diazotrophy to P availability. There are no known P acquisition mechanisms specific to diazotrophs. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.plantsci.2012.02.010

    DO - 10.1016/j.plantsci.2012.02.010

    M3 - Review article

    VL - 188

    SP - 25

    EP - 35

    JO - Plant Science

    JF - Plant Science

    SN - 0168-9452

    ER -