Protocol for Assessment of Sleep Quality and Duration in the Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study

a randomised controlled trial using online Patient Reported Outcome Measures

Amy Rogers (Lead / Corresponding author), Ian Morrison, David Rorie, Isla Mackenzie, Thomas MacDonald

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Abstract

Introduction We will use the existing online mechanisms of the Treatment in Morning versus Evening (TIME) study to collect patient-reported outcome measures of sleep quality to determine whether nocturnal dosing of antihypertensives affects sleep quality, when compared with morning dosing. The TIME study aims to determine if morning or evening dosing of antihypertensive medications is more effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. The cardiovascular end points in TIME are identified by individual-level linkage to routinely collected hospital admissions and mortality data; these data are supplemented with participant-completed follow-up questionnaires, administered online. This substudy will provide information regarding the relative acceptability of morning and evening dosing of antihypertensives that will be essential should the TIME study results prompt doctors to consider advising particular dosing times to their patients. Methods and analysis TIME participants are aged over 18 years and prescribed at least one antihypertensive drug, taken once a day. They are self-enrolled and consented on the secure TIME website (www.timestudy.co.UK) and then randomised to dosing time. Study follow-up is conducted by automated email. Average participant follow-up is expected to be 4 years. Participants in the sleep substudy are asked to complete an online sleep quality questionnaire at baseline, after 3 months and annually. This includes a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The primary outcome of the TIME Sleep substudy is sleep quality as measured by the PSQI. Secondary outcomes include sleep quantity and duration, and an analysis of any association between sleep quality and the main outcome measures of the TIME study (heart attack, stroke and vascular death).

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere021890
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalBMJ Open
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2018

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Sleep
Randomized Controlled Trials
Antihypertensive Agents
Therapeutics
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Hospital Mortality
Blood Vessels
Anxiety
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Depression

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Cardiology
  • Sleep medicine
  • Clinical trials
  • Therapeutics
  • Information technology
  • Biotechnology & Bioinformatics

Cite this

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title = "Protocol for Assessment of Sleep Quality and Duration in the Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study: a randomised controlled trial using online Patient Reported Outcome Measures",
abstract = "Introduction We will use the existing online mechanisms of the Treatment in Morning versus Evening (TIME) study to collect patient-reported outcome measures of sleep quality to determine whether nocturnal dosing of antihypertensives affects sleep quality, when compared with morning dosing. The TIME study aims to determine if morning or evening dosing of antihypertensive medications is more effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. The cardiovascular end points in TIME are identified by individual-level linkage to routinely collected hospital admissions and mortality data; these data are supplemented with participant-completed follow-up questionnaires, administered online. This substudy will provide information regarding the relative acceptability of morning and evening dosing of antihypertensives that will be essential should the TIME study results prompt doctors to consider advising particular dosing times to their patients. Methods and analysis TIME participants are aged over 18 years and prescribed at least one antihypertensive drug, taken once a day. They are self-enrolled and consented on the secure TIME website (www.timestudy.co.UK) and then randomised to dosing time. Study follow-up is conducted by automated email. Average participant follow-up is expected to be 4 years. Participants in the sleep substudy are asked to complete an online sleep quality questionnaire at baseline, after 3 months and annually. This includes a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The primary outcome of the TIME Sleep substudy is sleep quality as measured by the PSQI. Secondary outcomes include sleep quantity and duration, and an analysis of any association between sleep quality and the main outcome measures of the TIME study (heart attack, stroke and vascular death).",
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author = "Amy Rogers and Ian Morrison and David Rorie and Isla Mackenzie and Thomas MacDonald",
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doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2018-021890",
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T1 - Protocol for Assessment of Sleep Quality and Duration in the Treatment In Morning versus Evening (TIME) study

T2 - a randomised controlled trial using online Patient Reported Outcome Measures

AU - Rogers, Amy

AU - Morrison, Ian

AU - Rorie, David

AU - Mackenzie, Isla

AU - MacDonald, Thomas

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2018/6/7

Y1 - 2018/6/7

N2 - Introduction We will use the existing online mechanisms of the Treatment in Morning versus Evening (TIME) study to collect patient-reported outcome measures of sleep quality to determine whether nocturnal dosing of antihypertensives affects sleep quality, when compared with morning dosing. The TIME study aims to determine if morning or evening dosing of antihypertensive medications is more effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. The cardiovascular end points in TIME are identified by individual-level linkage to routinely collected hospital admissions and mortality data; these data are supplemented with participant-completed follow-up questionnaires, administered online. This substudy will provide information regarding the relative acceptability of morning and evening dosing of antihypertensives that will be essential should the TIME study results prompt doctors to consider advising particular dosing times to their patients. Methods and analysis TIME participants are aged over 18 years and prescribed at least one antihypertensive drug, taken once a day. They are self-enrolled and consented on the secure TIME website (www.timestudy.co.UK) and then randomised to dosing time. Study follow-up is conducted by automated email. Average participant follow-up is expected to be 4 years. Participants in the sleep substudy are asked to complete an online sleep quality questionnaire at baseline, after 3 months and annually. This includes a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The primary outcome of the TIME Sleep substudy is sleep quality as measured by the PSQI. Secondary outcomes include sleep quantity and duration, and an analysis of any association between sleep quality and the main outcome measures of the TIME study (heart attack, stroke and vascular death).

AB - Introduction We will use the existing online mechanisms of the Treatment in Morning versus Evening (TIME) study to collect patient-reported outcome measures of sleep quality to determine whether nocturnal dosing of antihypertensives affects sleep quality, when compared with morning dosing. The TIME study aims to determine if morning or evening dosing of antihypertensive medications is more effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. The cardiovascular end points in TIME are identified by individual-level linkage to routinely collected hospital admissions and mortality data; these data are supplemented with participant-completed follow-up questionnaires, administered online. This substudy will provide information regarding the relative acceptability of morning and evening dosing of antihypertensives that will be essential should the TIME study results prompt doctors to consider advising particular dosing times to their patients. Methods and analysis TIME participants are aged over 18 years and prescribed at least one antihypertensive drug, taken once a day. They are self-enrolled and consented on the secure TIME website (www.timestudy.co.UK) and then randomised to dosing time. Study follow-up is conducted by automated email. Average participant follow-up is expected to be 4 years. Participants in the sleep substudy are asked to complete an online sleep quality questionnaire at baseline, after 3 months and annually. This includes a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The primary outcome of the TIME Sleep substudy is sleep quality as measured by the PSQI. Secondary outcomes include sleep quantity and duration, and an analysis of any association between sleep quality and the main outcome measures of the TIME study (heart attack, stroke and vascular death).

KW - Hypertension

KW - Cardiology

KW - Sleep medicine

KW - Clinical trials

KW - Therapeutics

KW - Information technology

KW - Biotechnology & Bioinformatics

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DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-021890

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JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 6

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ER -