Providing Excellent Customer Service Is Therapeutic: Insights from an Implicit Association Neuromarketing Study

Gemma Anne Calvert (Lead / Corresponding author), Abhishek Pathak, Lim Elison Ai Ching, Geraldine Trufil, Eamon Philip Fulcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
57 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a combined biometric and implicit affective priming study of the emotional consequences of being the provider or receiver of either positive or negative customer service experiences. The study was conducted in two stages. Study 1 captured the moment-by-moment implicit emotional and physiological responses associated with receiving and providing good customer service. Study 2 employed an affective priming task to evaluate the implicit associations with good and poor customer service in a large sample of 1200 respondents across three Western countries. Our results show that both giving and receiving good customer service was perceived as pleasurable (Study 1) and at the same time, was implicitly associated with positive feelings (Study 2). The authors discuss the implications of the research for service providers in terms of the impact of these interactions on employee wellbeing, staff retention rates and customer satisfaction.
Original languageEnglish
Article number109
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume9
Issue number10
Early online date14 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Cognitive neuroscience
  • Customer service
  • Employee retention
  • Implicit reaction time
  • Neuromarketing
  • Semantic priming

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