Quantitative measurement and real-time tracking of high intensity focused ultrasound using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography: feasibility study

Nhan Le (Lead / Corresponding author), ShaoZhen Song, Ghulam Nabi, Ruikang Wang, Zhihong Huang

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    PURPOSE: Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) is proposed, as a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) imaging guidance to detect and track HIFU focus inside 1% agar samples in this work. The experiments studied the effect of varying HIFU power on the induction of shear wave, which can be implemented as a new technique to monitor focused ultrasound surgery (FUS).

    METHOD: A miniature HIFU transducer (1.02 MHz, 20 mm aperture diameter, 15 mm radius of curvature) was produced in-house, pressure-field mapped, and calibrated. The transducer was then embedded inside a 1% agar phantom, which was placed under PhS-OCT for observation, under various HIFU power settings (acoustic power, and number of cycles per pulse). Shear wave was induced on the sample surface by HIFU and was captured in full under PhS-OCT. The lowest HIFU acoustic power output for the detection of shear wave was found to be 0.36 W (1.02 MHz, 100 cycles/pulse), or with the number of cycles/pulse as low as 20 (1.02 MHz, 0.98 W acoustic power output).

    RESULTS: A linear relationship between acoustic power output and the maximum shear wave displacement was found in the first study. The second study explores a non-linear correlation between the (HIFU) numbers of cycles per pulse, and the maximum shear wave displacement.

    CONCLUSION: PhS-OCT demonstrates excellent tracking and detection of HIFU-induced shear wave. The results could benefit other imaging techniques in tracking and guiding HIFU focus. Further studies will explore the relationship between the physical transducer characteristics and the HIFU-induced shear wave.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)713-722
    Number of pages10
    JournalInternational Journal of Hyperthermia
    Volume32
    Issue number6
    Early online date5 Jul 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2016

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    Optical Coherence Tomography
    Feasibility Studies
    Acoustics
    Transducers
    Agar
    Ultrasonography
    Observation
    Pressure

    Keywords

    • Acoustic radiation force impulse
    • high intensity focused ultrasound
    • shearwave imaging
    • ultrasound

    Cite this

    @article{017db4a8a11d44c2baa49aca85e3283e,
    title = "Quantitative measurement and real-time tracking of high intensity focused ultrasound using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography: feasibility study",
    abstract = "PURPOSE: Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) is proposed, as a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) imaging guidance to detect and track HIFU focus inside 1{\%} agar samples in this work. The experiments studied the effect of varying HIFU power on the induction of shear wave, which can be implemented as a new technique to monitor focused ultrasound surgery (FUS).METHOD: A miniature HIFU transducer (1.02 MHz, 20 mm aperture diameter, 15 mm radius of curvature) was produced in-house, pressure-field mapped, and calibrated. The transducer was then embedded inside a 1{\%} agar phantom, which was placed under PhS-OCT for observation, under various HIFU power settings (acoustic power, and number of cycles per pulse). Shear wave was induced on the sample surface by HIFU and was captured in full under PhS-OCT. The lowest HIFU acoustic power output for the detection of shear wave was found to be 0.36 W (1.02 MHz, 100 cycles/pulse), or with the number of cycles/pulse as low as 20 (1.02 MHz, 0.98 W acoustic power output).RESULTS: A linear relationship between acoustic power output and the maximum shear wave displacement was found in the first study. The second study explores a non-linear correlation between the (HIFU) numbers of cycles per pulse, and the maximum shear wave displacement.CONCLUSION: PhS-OCT demonstrates excellent tracking and detection of HIFU-induced shear wave. The results could benefit other imaging techniques in tracking and guiding HIFU focus. Further studies will explore the relationship between the physical transducer characteristics and the HIFU-induced shear wave.",
    keywords = "Acoustic radiation force impulse, high intensity focused ultrasound, shearwave imaging, ultrasound",
    author = "Nhan Le and ShaoZhen Song and Ghulam Nabi and Ruikang Wang and Zhihong Huang",
    note = "Funding: NHS Ninewells Endownment",
    year = "2016",
    month = "8",
    day = "17",
    doi = "10.1080/02656736.2016.1190036",
    language = "English",
    volume = "32",
    pages = "713--722",
    journal = "International Journal of Hyperthermia",
    issn = "0265-6736",
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    number = "6",

    }

    Quantitative measurement and real-time tracking of high intensity focused ultrasound using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography : feasibility study. / Le, Nhan (Lead / Corresponding author); Song, ShaoZhen; Nabi, Ghulam; Wang, Ruikang; Huang, Zhihong.

    In: International Journal of Hyperthermia , Vol. 32, No. 6, 17.08.2016, p. 713-722.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Quantitative measurement and real-time tracking of high intensity focused ultrasound using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    T2 - feasibility study

    AU - Le, Nhan

    AU - Song, ShaoZhen

    AU - Nabi, Ghulam

    AU - Wang, Ruikang

    AU - Huang, Zhihong

    N1 - Funding: NHS Ninewells Endownment

    PY - 2016/8/17

    Y1 - 2016/8/17

    N2 - PURPOSE: Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) is proposed, as a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) imaging guidance to detect and track HIFU focus inside 1% agar samples in this work. The experiments studied the effect of varying HIFU power on the induction of shear wave, which can be implemented as a new technique to monitor focused ultrasound surgery (FUS).METHOD: A miniature HIFU transducer (1.02 MHz, 20 mm aperture diameter, 15 mm radius of curvature) was produced in-house, pressure-field mapped, and calibrated. The transducer was then embedded inside a 1% agar phantom, which was placed under PhS-OCT for observation, under various HIFU power settings (acoustic power, and number of cycles per pulse). Shear wave was induced on the sample surface by HIFU and was captured in full under PhS-OCT. The lowest HIFU acoustic power output for the detection of shear wave was found to be 0.36 W (1.02 MHz, 100 cycles/pulse), or with the number of cycles/pulse as low as 20 (1.02 MHz, 0.98 W acoustic power output).RESULTS: A linear relationship between acoustic power output and the maximum shear wave displacement was found in the first study. The second study explores a non-linear correlation between the (HIFU) numbers of cycles per pulse, and the maximum shear wave displacement.CONCLUSION: PhS-OCT demonstrates excellent tracking and detection of HIFU-induced shear wave. The results could benefit other imaging techniques in tracking and guiding HIFU focus. Further studies will explore the relationship between the physical transducer characteristics and the HIFU-induced shear wave.

    AB - PURPOSE: Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) is proposed, as a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) imaging guidance to detect and track HIFU focus inside 1% agar samples in this work. The experiments studied the effect of varying HIFU power on the induction of shear wave, which can be implemented as a new technique to monitor focused ultrasound surgery (FUS).METHOD: A miniature HIFU transducer (1.02 MHz, 20 mm aperture diameter, 15 mm radius of curvature) was produced in-house, pressure-field mapped, and calibrated. The transducer was then embedded inside a 1% agar phantom, which was placed under PhS-OCT for observation, under various HIFU power settings (acoustic power, and number of cycles per pulse). Shear wave was induced on the sample surface by HIFU and was captured in full under PhS-OCT. The lowest HIFU acoustic power output for the detection of shear wave was found to be 0.36 W (1.02 MHz, 100 cycles/pulse), or with the number of cycles/pulse as low as 20 (1.02 MHz, 0.98 W acoustic power output).RESULTS: A linear relationship between acoustic power output and the maximum shear wave displacement was found in the first study. The second study explores a non-linear correlation between the (HIFU) numbers of cycles per pulse, and the maximum shear wave displacement.CONCLUSION: PhS-OCT demonstrates excellent tracking and detection of HIFU-induced shear wave. The results could benefit other imaging techniques in tracking and guiding HIFU focus. Further studies will explore the relationship between the physical transducer characteristics and the HIFU-induced shear wave.

    KW - Acoustic radiation force impulse

    KW - high intensity focused ultrasound

    KW - shearwave imaging

    KW - ultrasound

    U2 - 10.1080/02656736.2016.1190036

    DO - 10.1080/02656736.2016.1190036

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 27380284

    VL - 32

    SP - 713

    EP - 722

    JO - International Journal of Hyperthermia

    JF - International Journal of Hyperthermia

    SN - 0265-6736

    IS - 6

    ER -