Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow

implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players

Badri R. Mohandhas, Navnit Makaram, Tim S. Drew, Weijie Wang, Graham P. Arnold, Rami J. Abboud (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lateral epicondylitis (LE) occurs in almost half of all tennis players. Racket-string tension is considered to be an important factor influencing the development of LE. No literature yet exists that substantiates how string-tension affects force transmission to the elbow, as implicated in LE development. We establish a quantitative relationship between string-tension and elbow loading, analyzing tennis strokes using rackets with varying string-tensions.

METHODS: Twenty recreational tennis players simulated backhand tennis strokes using three rackets strung at tensions of 200 N, 222 N and 245 N. Accelerometers recorded accelerations at the elbow, wrist and racket handle. Average peak acceleration was determined to correlate string-tension with elbow loading.

RESULTS: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed when average peak acceleration at the elbow at 200 N string-tension (acceleration of 5.58 m/s(2)) was compared with that at 222 N tension (acceleration of 6.83 m/s(2)) and 245 N tension (acceleration of 7.45 m/s(2)). The 200 N racket induced the least acceleration at the elbow.

CONCLUSIONS: Although parameters determining force transmission to the elbow during a tennis stroke are complex, the present study was able to control these parameters, isolating the effect of string-tension. Lower string-tensions transmit less force to the elbow in backhand strokes. Reducing string-tension should be considered favourably with respect to reducing the risk of developing LE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-191
Number of pages8
JournalShoulder and Elbow
Volume8
Issue number3
Early online date6 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

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Tennis Elbow
Tennis
Elbow
Stroke
Wrist

Keywords

  • Journal article
  • Biomechanics
  • Elbo
  • Lateral epicondylitis
  • String-tension
  • Tennis

Cite this

@article{b531ab96393f438cb54a97c858fbe549,
title = "Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow: implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Lateral epicondylitis (LE) occurs in almost half of all tennis players. Racket-string tension is considered to be an important factor influencing the development of LE. No literature yet exists that substantiates how string-tension affects force transmission to the elbow, as implicated in LE development. We establish a quantitative relationship between string-tension and elbow loading, analyzing tennis strokes using rackets with varying string-tensions.METHODS: Twenty recreational tennis players simulated backhand tennis strokes using three rackets strung at tensions of 200 N, 222 N and 245 N. Accelerometers recorded accelerations at the elbow, wrist and racket handle. Average peak acceleration was determined to correlate string-tension with elbow loading.RESULTS: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed when average peak acceleration at the elbow at 200 N string-tension (acceleration of 5.58 m/s(2)) was compared with that at 222 N tension (acceleration of 6.83 m/s(2)) and 245 N tension (acceleration of 7.45 m/s(2)). The 200 N racket induced the least acceleration at the elbow.CONCLUSIONS: Although parameters determining force transmission to the elbow during a tennis stroke are complex, the present study was able to control these parameters, isolating the effect of string-tension. Lower string-tensions transmit less force to the elbow in backhand strokes. Reducing string-tension should be considered favourably with respect to reducing the risk of developing LE.",
keywords = "Journal article, Biomechanics, Elbo, Lateral epicondylitis, String-tension, Tennis",
author = "Mohandhas, {Badri R.} and Navnit Makaram and Drew, {Tim S.} and Weijie Wang and Arnold, {Graham P.} and Abboud, {Rami J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1177/1758573216640201",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "184--191",
journal = "Shoulder and Elbow",
issn = "1758-5732",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "3",

}

Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow : implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players. / Mohandhas, Badri R.; Makaram, Navnit; Drew, Tim S.; Wang, Weijie; Arnold, Graham P.; Abboud, Rami J. (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Shoulder and Elbow, Vol. 8, No. 3, 07.2016, p. 184-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow

T2 - implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players

AU - Mohandhas, Badri R.

AU - Makaram, Navnit

AU - Drew, Tim S.

AU - Wang, Weijie

AU - Arnold, Graham P.

AU - Abboud, Rami J.

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: Lateral epicondylitis (LE) occurs in almost half of all tennis players. Racket-string tension is considered to be an important factor influencing the development of LE. No literature yet exists that substantiates how string-tension affects force transmission to the elbow, as implicated in LE development. We establish a quantitative relationship between string-tension and elbow loading, analyzing tennis strokes using rackets with varying string-tensions.METHODS: Twenty recreational tennis players simulated backhand tennis strokes using three rackets strung at tensions of 200 N, 222 N and 245 N. Accelerometers recorded accelerations at the elbow, wrist and racket handle. Average peak acceleration was determined to correlate string-tension with elbow loading.RESULTS: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed when average peak acceleration at the elbow at 200 N string-tension (acceleration of 5.58 m/s(2)) was compared with that at 222 N tension (acceleration of 6.83 m/s(2)) and 245 N tension (acceleration of 7.45 m/s(2)). The 200 N racket induced the least acceleration at the elbow.CONCLUSIONS: Although parameters determining force transmission to the elbow during a tennis stroke are complex, the present study was able to control these parameters, isolating the effect of string-tension. Lower string-tensions transmit less force to the elbow in backhand strokes. Reducing string-tension should be considered favourably with respect to reducing the risk of developing LE.

AB - BACKGROUND: Lateral epicondylitis (LE) occurs in almost half of all tennis players. Racket-string tension is considered to be an important factor influencing the development of LE. No literature yet exists that substantiates how string-tension affects force transmission to the elbow, as implicated in LE development. We establish a quantitative relationship between string-tension and elbow loading, analyzing tennis strokes using rackets with varying string-tensions.METHODS: Twenty recreational tennis players simulated backhand tennis strokes using three rackets strung at tensions of 200 N, 222 N and 245 N. Accelerometers recorded accelerations at the elbow, wrist and racket handle. Average peak acceleration was determined to correlate string-tension with elbow loading.RESULTS: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed when average peak acceleration at the elbow at 200 N string-tension (acceleration of 5.58 m/s(2)) was compared with that at 222 N tension (acceleration of 6.83 m/s(2)) and 245 N tension (acceleration of 7.45 m/s(2)). The 200 N racket induced the least acceleration at the elbow.CONCLUSIONS: Although parameters determining force transmission to the elbow during a tennis stroke are complex, the present study was able to control these parameters, isolating the effect of string-tension. Lower string-tensions transmit less force to the elbow in backhand strokes. Reducing string-tension should be considered favourably with respect to reducing the risk of developing LE.

KW - Journal article

KW - Biomechanics

KW - Elbo

KW - Lateral epicondylitis

KW - String-tension

KW - Tennis

U2 - 10.1177/1758573216640201

DO - 10.1177/1758573216640201

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 184

EP - 191

JO - Shoulder and Elbow

JF - Shoulder and Elbow

SN - 1758-5732

IS - 3

ER -