Randomized control trial of Teaching Recovery Techniques in rural occupied Palestine: Effect on adolescent dissociation

Ian Barron (Lead / Corresponding author), Ghassan Abdallah, Unni Heltne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

The current study assessed the effect of a cognitive behavioral group intervention, Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT), for adolescents with high levels of posttraumatic stress (n = 154), from villages in occupied Palestine. A randomized control trial involved standardized measures to assess war stressors, posttraumatic stress, depression, and dissociation. Program fidelity was measured by presenter and observer ratings and program delivery cost was calculated per adolescent. High levels of traumatic exposure, dissociation, and posttraumatic stress were found. In comparison to a Wait List group (n = 75), TRT adolescents reported significantly fewer posttraumatic stress symptoms post-intervention. Depression and dissociation remained stable for TRT adolescents, but worsened for Wait List. Given the high returns and low costs, this costbenefit analysis makes a clear case for TRT to be delivered throughout the West Bank. Longitudinal evaluation is needed to assess adolescent traumatization and the impact of TRT within a context of ongoing violence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)955-973
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
Volume25
Issue number9
Early online date4 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Nov 2016

Keywords

  • traumatization
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • posttraumatic stress
  • depression

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