Re-cognising Disability

Cross-Examining Social Inclusion through the Prism of Queer Anti-Sociality

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Studies in medical sociology and law construct disability as anti-productive, unthinkable and unintelligible. This article takes the view, long recognised in the phenomenological tradition, that alternate embodiments result in markedly different forms of human ontology. Enter queer theory. Antithetical to the proposition that disabled people are the same as the ‘abled’, I point to a (trans)difference and suggest that a way out of the confines of recuperative liberal intolerance is to figure the disabled body conceptually as anti-social and ableist normativity as (non)compulsory. I propose that the disabled body is counter-intuitive and actualises, negotiates ‘negative’ ways of knowing or disidentifications. Can queer theory be merely grafted onto the cripped body and dragged onto another inflection?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-238
Number of pages30
JournalJindal Global Law Review
Volume4
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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sociality
disability
inclusion
medical sociology
normativity
ontology
tolerance
Law
queer theory

Cite this

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