Re-thinking destitution in the UK

typologies, spaces and transitions

Deepak Gopinath (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Destitution, a severe form of poverty still persists in modern, industrialised nations such as the UK despite a robust, social security system in place. Increased use of food banks, inadequate housing provisions etc. point to evidence that there are those who experience such extreme forms of deprivation. There is therefore the need to understand why destitution persists and if it might be possible to contemplate alternative approaches beyond the currently employed legal frameworks focussing mostly on asylum seekers. This commentary presents a conceptualising of various spaces and types of destitutes in the UK and points to where policy makers and the third sector might sector intervene so that transitions from not destitute to being destitute might be reduced.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)341-347
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies
    Volume2
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    asylum seeker
    social security
    deprivation
    typology
    bank
    housing
    poverty
    food
    evidence
    experience

    Cite this

    @article{92af815670cb4785a13c997afe74d210,
    title = "Re-thinking destitution in the UK: typologies, spaces and transitions",
    abstract = "Destitution, a severe form of poverty still persists in modern, industrialised nations such as the UK despite a robust, social security system in place. Increased use of food banks, inadequate housing provisions etc. point to evidence that there are those who experience such extreme forms of deprivation. There is therefore the need to understand why destitution persists and if it might be possible to contemplate alternative approaches beyond the currently employed legal frameworks focussing mostly on asylum seekers. This commentary presents a conceptualising of various spaces and types of destitutes in the UK and points to where policy makers and the third sector might sector intervene so that transitions from not destitute to being destitute might be reduced.",
    author = "Deepak Gopinath",
    year = "2014",
    doi = "10.1504/IJHRCS.2014.067881",
    language = "English",
    volume = "2",
    pages = "341--347",
    journal = "International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies",
    issn = "2050-103X",
    number = "4",

    }

    Re-thinking destitution in the UK : typologies, spaces and transitions. / Gopinath, Deepak (Lead / Corresponding author).

    In: International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2014, p. 341-347.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Re-thinking destitution in the UK

    T2 - typologies, spaces and transitions

    AU - Gopinath, Deepak

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - Destitution, a severe form of poverty still persists in modern, industrialised nations such as the UK despite a robust, social security system in place. Increased use of food banks, inadequate housing provisions etc. point to evidence that there are those who experience such extreme forms of deprivation. There is therefore the need to understand why destitution persists and if it might be possible to contemplate alternative approaches beyond the currently employed legal frameworks focussing mostly on asylum seekers. This commentary presents a conceptualising of various spaces and types of destitutes in the UK and points to where policy makers and the third sector might sector intervene so that transitions from not destitute to being destitute might be reduced.

    AB - Destitution, a severe form of poverty still persists in modern, industrialised nations such as the UK despite a robust, social security system in place. Increased use of food banks, inadequate housing provisions etc. point to evidence that there are those who experience such extreme forms of deprivation. There is therefore the need to understand why destitution persists and if it might be possible to contemplate alternative approaches beyond the currently employed legal frameworks focussing mostly on asylum seekers. This commentary presents a conceptualising of various spaces and types of destitutes in the UK and points to where policy makers and the third sector might sector intervene so that transitions from not destitute to being destitute might be reduced.

    U2 - 10.1504/IJHRCS.2014.067881

    DO - 10.1504/IJHRCS.2014.067881

    M3 - Article

    VL - 2

    SP - 341

    EP - 347

    JO - International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies

    JF - International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies

    SN - 2050-103X

    IS - 4

    ER -