Readers and service commissioners require clear financial disclosures: Comment on innovation, research integrity, and change: A conflict of interest management framework for program developers (Sanders et al., 2019)

Philip Wilson (Lead / Corresponding author), Louise Marryat, Lucy Thompson, James Coyne, Michael Allerhand

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Sanders et al.'s proposal for a management framework for conflicting interests among program developers is very welcome. The underlying principles of such a framework must nevertheless prioritise the need for researchers and commissioners of services to make objective assessments of the impact of interventions reported in journal articles. This is particularly important in the field of randomised trials which may influence public sector expenditure. Using a strict definition derived from known financial conflict of interest, we have demonstrated that child-based effect sizes are much lower for independent studies than for studies with developer involvement. On this basis, we propose that journals publishing evaluations of psychosocial interventions should agree a standardised format for declarations of conflicts of interest based on that recommended by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-107
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Psychologist
Volume55
Issue number2
Early online date21 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • child behavior
  • conflict of interest
  • parenting programmes
  • systematic review

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