Recommendations for the transition of patients with ADHD from child to adult healthcare services: a consensus statement from the UK adult ADHD network

Susan Young (Lead / Corresponding author), Marios Adamou, Philip Asherson, David Coghill, Bill Colley, Gisli Gudjonsson, Chris Hollis, Jane McCarthy, Ulrich Müller, Moli Paul, Mark Pitts, Muhammad Arif

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    30 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    The aim of this consensus statement was to discuss transition of patients with ADHD from child to adult healthcare services, and formulate recommendations to facilitate successful transition. An expert workshop was convened in June 2012 by the UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN), attended by a multidisciplinary team of mental health professionals, allied professionals and patients. It was concluded that transitions must be planned through joint meetings involving referring/receiving services, patients and their families. Negotiation may be required to balance parental desire for continued involvement in their child's care, and the child's growing autonomy. Clear transition protocols can maintain standards of care, detailing relevant timeframes, responsibilities of agencies and preparing contingencies. Transition should be viewed as a process not an event, and should normally occur by the age of 18, however flexibility is required to accommodate individual needs. Transition is often poorly experienced, and adherence to clear recommendations is necessary to ensure effective transition and prevent drop-out from services.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number301
    Number of pages10
    JournalBMC Psychiatry
    Volume16
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Aug 2016

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