Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL): a new generic self-reported outcome measure for use with people experiencing mental health difficulties

Anju Devianee Keetharuth (Lead / Corresponding author), John E. Brazier, Janice Connell, Jakob Bue Bjorner, Jill Carlton, Elizabeth Taylor Buck, Thomas Ricketts, Kirsty McKendrick, John Browne, Timothy Croudace, Michael Barkham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    72 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Background: Outcome measures for mental health services need to adopt a service user recovery focus.

    Aims: To develop and validate a 10 and 20-item self-report recovery-focused quality of life outcome measure named Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL).

    Method: Qualitative methods for item development and initial testing, and quantitative methods for item reduction and scale construction were used. Data from >6500 service users were factor analysed and item response theory models employed to inform item selection. The measures were tested for reliability, validity and responsiveness.

    Results: ReQoL-10 and ReQoL-20 contain positively and negatively worded items covering seven themes: activity, hope, belonging and relationships, self-perception, wellbeing, autonomy, and physical health. Both versions achieved acceptable internal consistency, test-retest reliability (>.85), known group differences, convergence with related measures, and were responsive over time (SRM>.4). They performed marginally better than SWEMWBS and markedly better than EQ-5D.

    Conclusions: Both versions are appropriate for measuring service-user recovery-focused quality of life outcomes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)42-49
    Number of pages8
    JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume212
    Issue number1
    Early online date4 Jan 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Jan 2018

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