Reducing the Variability of Predicting the Longevity of Reinforced Concrete Marine Structures Subjected to Physical and Chemical Degradation

Martyn Jones, John Forth, Christopher Thistlethwaite, Lee Higgins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Modeling the longevity of marine structures is inadequate and time to ultimate failure is extremely difficult to
predict. The sheer number of variables affecting the failure causes large variability in predictions. Experimental
works were undertaken to further understand the rates of corrosion in submerged concrete to enhance prediction of
steel section losses. This paper reports early findings from this work where CEM 1 type reinforced concrete was
exposed to environments with variable oxygen concentrations. After accelerated corrosion initiation, corrosion measurements using a potentiostatic method were used to determine the average loss of steel due to corrosion. Corrosion is shown to continue to occur although the environment has a lack of oxygen. Rates are up to 50% lower exposed to oxygen concentrations of 0 to 4ppm, than in 8ppm or air exposure. These results are contradictory to common thinking suggesting that without oxygen, corrosion rates would be negligible. Further experimental works and project integration is discussed outlining future steps for the Universities of Dundee and Leeds to further reduce variability in predicting longevity off marine structures.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConcrete in the low carbon era
EditorsM Roderick Jones, Moray D Newlands, Judith E Halliday, Laszlo J Csetenyi, Li Zheng, Michael J McCarthy, Thomas D Dyer
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherUniversity of Dundee
Pages1554-1562
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9780957326309
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Chemical degradation
  • Longevity
  • Marine structures
  • Physical damage

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  • Cite this

    Jones, M., Forth, J., Thistlethwaite, C., & Higgins, L. (2012). Reducing the Variability of Predicting the Longevity of Reinforced Concrete Marine Structures Subjected to Physical and Chemical Degradation. In M. R. Jones, M. D. Newlands, J. E. Halliday, L. J. Csetenyi, L. Zheng, M. J. McCarthy, & T. D. Dyer (Eds.), Concrete in the low carbon era (pp. 1554-1562). University of Dundee. http://discovery.dundee.ac.uk/portal/files/6514437/proceedings.pdf