Regulation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase by antigen receptor and Ca2+ in T lymphocytes

Peter Tamás, Simon A. Hawley, Rosemary G. Clarke, Kirsty J. Mustard, Kevin Green, D. Grahame Hardie, Doreen A. Cantrell (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    226 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has a crucial role in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. This study shows that human and mouse T lymphocytes express AMPKα1 and that this is rapidly activated in response to triggering of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). TCR stimulation of AMPK was dependent on the adaptors LAT and SLP76 and could be mimicked by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ with Ca2+ ionophores or thapsigargin. AMPK activation was also induced by energy stress and depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). However, TCR and Ca2+ stimulation of AMPK required the activity of Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs), whereas AMPK activation induced by increased AMP/ATP ratios did not. These experiments reveal two distinct pathways for the regulation of AMPK in T lymphocytes. The role of AMPK is to promote ATP conservation and production. The rapid activation of AMPK in response to Ca2+ signaling in T lymphocytes thus reveals that TCR triggering is linked to an evolutionally conserved serine kinase that regulates energy metabolism. Moreover, AMPK does not just react to cellular energy depletion but also anticipates it. JEM

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1665-1670
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
    Volume203
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2006

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