Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth

Graeme Hutton, David Jameson, Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects

    Research output: Other contribution

    Original languageEnglish
    PublisherLeadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects)
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Keywords

    • Architecture
    • Hospital architecture
    • Scotland
    • Architectural design

    Cite this

    Hutton, G., Jameson, D., & Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (2008). Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth. Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects).
    Hutton, Graeme ; Jameson, David ; Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects. / Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth. 2008. Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects).
    @misc{c85db712f84b43c38572f5bdb0364aed,
    title = "Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth",
    keywords = "Architecture, Hospital architecture, Scotland, Architectural design",
    author = "Graeme Hutton and David Jameson and {Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects}",
    note = "This research develops themes and ideas provoked by the national debate on healthcare procurement, where PFI&PPP processes diminish the possibility of specific – condition led – architectural responses. The primary aim is to establish guidelines to ensure appropriate organisational, spatial, environmental and expressive architectural responses to specific healthcare needs. The objectives are to generate condition- specific designs, build and then evaluate these specific solutions and assess patient wellbeing. Recording and evaluating treatment requirements and patient needs in relation to specific chronic conditions and how these interface with various architectural parameters: privacy, light, sound, temperature, scale, colour, texture and so on. Generating design solutions which cross refer treatment requirements with patient needs and appropriately designed environments. On average patients undergo dialysis for periods of 6hrs three times weekly. This is a largely static, bed-chair bound process whereby, as a result of dialysis, much heat is lost from the patient; the requisite comfort levels required differs between patients and also between patients and medical staff within the same volume. Lighting needs are carefully controlled, entertainment should be available and periods of shared communication will alternate with a need for privacy – a feeling of one's own space. Individual bays are defined using a carefully articulated ceiling. The form of this maximizes reflected ambient natural or artificial light and helps zone heating and ventilation, providing a degree of individual control. Within a communal room for up to 12 patients the vaults infer a series of compartments or ‘places’. Further to the above the strategic zoning and primary organisation of the design eradicates cross circulation between ‘clean’ and ‘dirty’ elements of the building. This minimises the risk of cross contamination with MRSA and other bacteria.",
    year = "2008",
    language = "English",
    publisher = "Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects)",
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    Hutton, G, Jameson, D & Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects 2008, Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth. Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects).

    Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth. / Hutton, Graeme; Jameson, David; Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects.

    Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects). 2008, .

    Research output: Other contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth

    AU - Hutton, Graeme

    AU - Jameson, David

    AU - Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects

    N1 - This research develops themes and ideas provoked by the national debate on healthcare procurement, where PFI&PPP processes diminish the possibility of specific – condition led – architectural responses. The primary aim is to establish guidelines to ensure appropriate organisational, spatial, environmental and expressive architectural responses to specific healthcare needs. The objectives are to generate condition- specific designs, build and then evaluate these specific solutions and assess patient wellbeing. Recording and evaluating treatment requirements and patient needs in relation to specific chronic conditions and how these interface with various architectural parameters: privacy, light, sound, temperature, scale, colour, texture and so on. Generating design solutions which cross refer treatment requirements with patient needs and appropriately designed environments. On average patients undergo dialysis for periods of 6hrs three times weekly. This is a largely static, bed-chair bound process whereby, as a result of dialysis, much heat is lost from the patient; the requisite comfort levels required differs between patients and also between patients and medical staff within the same volume. Lighting needs are carefully controlled, entertainment should be available and periods of shared communication will alternate with a need for privacy – a feeling of one's own space. Individual bays are defined using a carefully articulated ceiling. The form of this maximizes reflected ambient natural or artificial light and helps zone heating and ventilation, providing a degree of individual control. Within a communal room for up to 12 patients the vaults infer a series of compartments or ‘places’. Further to the above the strategic zoning and primary organisation of the design eradicates cross circulation between ‘clean’ and ‘dirty’ elements of the building. This minimises the risk of cross contamination with MRSA and other bacteria.

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    KW - Architecture

    KW - Hospital architecture

    KW - Scotland

    KW - Architectural design

    M3 - Other contribution

    PB - Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects (LJRH Chartered Architects)

    ER -

    Hutton G, Jameson D, Leadingham Jameson Rogers & Hynd Chartered Architects. Renal and oncology unit, Perth Royal Infirmary, Perth. 2008.