Renal interaction between angiotensin II and the sympathetic nervous system in man

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

    Abstract

    The renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) are
    essential for sodium homeostasis in man, and their independent roles in this respect are well established. However, recent animal evidence suggests that angiotensin II (Ang II) may interact with the SNS via several mechanisms that could play a role in mediating changes in sodium excretion. We have therefore sought evidence of such an interaction in man by examining the effect of prazosin (PRZ), an a, adrenergic antagonist, on the anti-natriuretic effect of Ang II. We used prazosin and Ang II,both in low doses (0-25 mg and 1 ng/kg per min respectively) so that systemic blood pressure was not altered by either.

    Eight salt-replete male volunteers (mean age + S.E.M. 23 + 2 yr; 24 h urinary Na+ excretion: 176 + 20 mmol/24 h) were studied on 4 occasions at least 7 days apart. Subjects were given an initial water load of 20 ml kg-' body weight and thereafter ingested the same volume of water as was passed in the urine. The following treatment combinations were administered in single-blind randomized fashion: glucose 5% used as a placebo (P), PRZ 0-25 mg+ 5 % glucose (P), PRZ + Ang II 1 ng/kg per min, P + Ang II, P + P. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored at regular intervals.

    The absolute sodium excretion (UvNa+) [mean + S.E.M.; ,umol/min] at 40 min after the Ang II or P infusion for all four study days were: P + P, 148+15; PRZ + P,169 + 16; Ang JJ+ P, 91 + 7 (P < 0 01 vs placebo using Manova); PRZ + Ang II, 133+21. Systemic BP and HR did not differ between study days.

    In conclusion, we have shown that prazosin blunts the anti-natriuretic effect of
    Ang II. This suggests that renal a, adrenoreceptors may exert a permissive role on the renal effects of circulating angiotensin II in man.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)139P
    Number of pages1
    JournalJournal of Physiology
    Volume430
    Publication statusPublished - 1990
    EventPhysiological Society. Oxford Meeting - Oxford, United Kingdom
    Duration: 27 Jul 199028 Jul 1990

    Fingerprint

    Sympathetic Nervous System
    Prazosin
    Angiotensin II
    Kidney
    Natriuretic Agents
    Sodium
    Blood Pressure
    Heart Rate
    Placebos
    Glucose
    Adrenergic Antagonists
    Water
    Renin-Angiotensin System
    Volunteers
    Homeostasis
    Salts
    Body Weight
    Urine

    Cite this

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    title = "Renal interaction between angiotensin II and the sympathetic nervous system in man",
    abstract = "The renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) areessential for sodium homeostasis in man, and their independent roles in this respect are well established. However, recent animal evidence suggests that angiotensin II (Ang II) may interact with the SNS via several mechanisms that could play a role in mediating changes in sodium excretion. We have therefore sought evidence of such an interaction in man by examining the effect of prazosin (PRZ), an a, adrenergic antagonist, on the anti-natriuretic effect of Ang II. We used prazosin and Ang II,both in low doses (0-25 mg and 1 ng/kg per min respectively) so that systemic blood pressure was not altered by either.Eight salt-replete male volunteers (mean age + S.E.M. 23 + 2 yr; 24 h urinary Na+ excretion: 176 + 20 mmol/24 h) were studied on 4 occasions at least 7 days apart. Subjects were given an initial water load of 20 ml kg-' body weight and thereafter ingested the same volume of water as was passed in the urine. The following treatment combinations were administered in single-blind randomized fashion: glucose 5{\%} used as a placebo (P), PRZ 0-25 mg+ 5 {\%} glucose (P), PRZ + Ang II 1 ng/kg per min, P + Ang II, P + P. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored at regular intervals.The absolute sodium excretion (UvNa+) [mean + S.E.M.; ,umol/min] at 40 min after the Ang II or P infusion for all four study days were: P + P, 148+15; PRZ + P,169 + 16; Ang JJ+ P, 91 + 7 (P < 0 01 vs placebo using Manova); PRZ + Ang II, 133+21. Systemic BP and HR did not differ between study days.In conclusion, we have shown that prazosin blunts the anti-natriuretic effect ofAng II. This suggests that renal a, adrenoreceptors may exert a permissive role on the renal effects of circulating angiotensin II in man.",
    author = "Lang, {C. C.} and Rahman, {A. R.} and Struthers, {A. D.}",
    year = "1990",
    language = "English",
    volume = "430",
    pages = "139P",
    journal = "Journal of Physiology",
    issn = "0022-3751",
    publisher = "Wiley",

    }

    Renal interaction between angiotensin II and the sympathetic nervous system in man. / Lang, C. C.; Rahman, A. R.; Struthers, A. D.

    In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 430, 1990, p. 139P.

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Renal interaction between angiotensin II and the sympathetic nervous system in man

    AU - Lang, C. C.

    AU - Rahman, A. R.

    AU - Struthers, A. D.

    PY - 1990

    Y1 - 1990

    N2 - The renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) areessential for sodium homeostasis in man, and their independent roles in this respect are well established. However, recent animal evidence suggests that angiotensin II (Ang II) may interact with the SNS via several mechanisms that could play a role in mediating changes in sodium excretion. We have therefore sought evidence of such an interaction in man by examining the effect of prazosin (PRZ), an a, adrenergic antagonist, on the anti-natriuretic effect of Ang II. We used prazosin and Ang II,both in low doses (0-25 mg and 1 ng/kg per min respectively) so that systemic blood pressure was not altered by either.Eight salt-replete male volunteers (mean age + S.E.M. 23 + 2 yr; 24 h urinary Na+ excretion: 176 + 20 mmol/24 h) were studied on 4 occasions at least 7 days apart. Subjects were given an initial water load of 20 ml kg-' body weight and thereafter ingested the same volume of water as was passed in the urine. The following treatment combinations were administered in single-blind randomized fashion: glucose 5% used as a placebo (P), PRZ 0-25 mg+ 5 % glucose (P), PRZ + Ang II 1 ng/kg per min, P + Ang II, P + P. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored at regular intervals.The absolute sodium excretion (UvNa+) [mean + S.E.M.; ,umol/min] at 40 min after the Ang II or P infusion for all four study days were: P + P, 148+15; PRZ + P,169 + 16; Ang JJ+ P, 91 + 7 (P < 0 01 vs placebo using Manova); PRZ + Ang II, 133+21. Systemic BP and HR did not differ between study days.In conclusion, we have shown that prazosin blunts the anti-natriuretic effect ofAng II. This suggests that renal a, adrenoreceptors may exert a permissive role on the renal effects of circulating angiotensin II in man.

    AB - The renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) areessential for sodium homeostasis in man, and their independent roles in this respect are well established. However, recent animal evidence suggests that angiotensin II (Ang II) may interact with the SNS via several mechanisms that could play a role in mediating changes in sodium excretion. We have therefore sought evidence of such an interaction in man by examining the effect of prazosin (PRZ), an a, adrenergic antagonist, on the anti-natriuretic effect of Ang II. We used prazosin and Ang II,both in low doses (0-25 mg and 1 ng/kg per min respectively) so that systemic blood pressure was not altered by either.Eight salt-replete male volunteers (mean age + S.E.M. 23 + 2 yr; 24 h urinary Na+ excretion: 176 + 20 mmol/24 h) were studied on 4 occasions at least 7 days apart. Subjects were given an initial water load of 20 ml kg-' body weight and thereafter ingested the same volume of water as was passed in the urine. The following treatment combinations were administered in single-blind randomized fashion: glucose 5% used as a placebo (P), PRZ 0-25 mg+ 5 % glucose (P), PRZ + Ang II 1 ng/kg per min, P + Ang II, P + P. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored at regular intervals.The absolute sodium excretion (UvNa+) [mean + S.E.M.; ,umol/min] at 40 min after the Ang II or P infusion for all four study days were: P + P, 148+15; PRZ + P,169 + 16; Ang JJ+ P, 91 + 7 (P < 0 01 vs placebo using Manova); PRZ + Ang II, 133+21. Systemic BP and HR did not differ between study days.In conclusion, we have shown that prazosin blunts the anti-natriuretic effect ofAng II. This suggests that renal a, adrenoreceptors may exert a permissive role on the renal effects of circulating angiotensin II in man.

    M3 - Meeting abstract

    VL - 430

    SP - 139P

    JO - Journal of Physiology

    JF - Journal of Physiology

    SN - 0022-3751

    ER -