Reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in the UK: the patients' perspective

M. Abu-Serriah (Lead / Corresponding author), D. Dhariwala, G. Martin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Our intention is to shed theoretical and practical light on the professional reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) in the UK by drawing on theories from management literature, particularly concerning reputation. Since professional reputation is socially constructed by stakeholders, we used interpretivist methods to conduct a qualitative study of patients (stakeholders) to gain an insight into their view of the profession. Findings from our focus groups highlighted the importance of “soft-wired skills” and showed a perception – reality gap in the interaction between patients and doctors. They also highlighted the importance of consistency, relational coordination, mechanisms to enable transparent feedback, and professional processes of governance. To help understand how best to manage the reputation of the specialty, we also explored how this is affected by the media and the Internet.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)321-325
    Number of pages5
    JournalBritish Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
    Volume53
    Issue number4
    Early online date24 Jan 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

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    Keywords

    • maxillofacial
    • reputation
    • visibility
    • image
    • identity
    • internet

    Cite this

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    Reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in the UK : the patients' perspective. / Abu-Serriah, M. (Lead / Corresponding author); Dhariwala, D.; Martin, G.

    In: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 53, No. 4, 04.2015, p. 321-325.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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