Response to a novel, weight self-awareness plan used in a multi-component lifestyle intervention programme to reduce breast cancer risk factors in older women: secondary analysis from The ActWELL trial

Suzanne M. M. Zaremba, Martine Stead, Jennifer McKell, Ronan E. O'Carroll, Nanette Mutrie, Shaun Treweek, Annie S. Anderson (Lead / Corresponding author),

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: The ActWELL randomised controlled trial assessed the effectiveness of a weight management programme delivered by volunteer lifestyle coaches (LCs) in women attending breast clinics. The intervention focused on caloric intake and physical activity, utilising behavioural change techniques including a weight awareness plan (WAP). The current work is a secondary analysis of the ActWELL data and aims to examine the response to the weight self-awareness plan (used as part of the intervention programme).

Methods: The LCs invited participants (n = 279) to undertake an implementation intention discussion to formulate a self-weighing (SW) plan. Bodyweight scales were offered, and recording books provided. The physical activity component of the intervention focused on a walking plan assessed by accelerometers. The LCs contacted participants by telephone monthly and provided personalised feedback. Mann–Whitney tests and chi-squared analysis were used to examine the effect of SW on weight change. A qualitative evaluation utilising semi-structured interviews was also undertaken.

Results: Most participants (96.4%) agreed to set a weekly SW goal and 76 (27%) requested scales. At 12 months, 226 (81%) returned for follow up. The median (interquartile range) weight change for those who self- reported at least one weight (n = 211) was −2.3 kg (−5.0 to 0.0) compared to −1.2 kg (−5.0 to 0.03) in those who did not (n = 14). Participants who reported weights on more than eight occasions (39%) were significantly more likely (p = 0.012) to achieve 5% weight loss compared to those who weighed less often. Low numbers of accelerometers were returned that did not allow for significance testing. Qualitative data (n = 24) indicated that many participants found the WAP helpful and motivating.

Conclusions: Greater adherence to the WAP initiated by volunteer coaches is associated with achieving 5% weight loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-276
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume36
Issue number1
Early online date14 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Self-monitoring
  • weight
  • breast-cancer
  • self-monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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