Risk factors for aspiration in community-acquired pneumonia: Analysis of a hospitalized UK cohort

Joanne K. Taylor, Gillian B. Fleming, Aran Singanayagam, Adam T. Hill, James D. Chalmers

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    48 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background There is a move toward finding clinically useful "phenotypes" in community-acquired pneumonia: groups of patients displaying distinct clinical characteristics, microbiology, and prognosis. Aspiration pneumonia is an intuitive clinical phenotype; however, to date there are no recognized diagnostic criteria, and data regarding outcomes in suspected aspiration are limited. Methods An observational study of 1348 patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia in the United Kingdom examined both short- and long-term outcomes for patients at risk of aspiration pneumonia. Patients were defined as "at risk" in the presence of chronic neurologic disorders, esophageal disorders and dysphagia, impaired conscious level, vomiting, or witnessed aspiration. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included 1-year mortality, readmissions, and recurrent pneumonia within 1 year. Results Some 13.8% of the cohort were classified as "at risk of aspiration." These patients were older (median age, 74 years [interquartile range, 60-84] vs 66 years [interquartile range, 49-77]; P
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)995-1001
    Number of pages7
    JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
    Volume126
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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