Risking Subjectivity in Everyday Social Work Practice

Claire Ferrier

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article considers the concept of risk by exploring the case of a young person, Bruce, 21, with whom I worked on a Through Care After Care (TCAC), social work placement. Bruce and I had developed an effective and caring working relationship. I question if this would have been if I had not demonstrated trust and compassion. I propose that modern-day social work practice falls foul to the relationship being reduced or replaced by a narrow ideological form of professional conduct. In doing so, I draw on concepts of dual relationships/boundary crossing and care ethics, highlighting the susceptibility of these being degraded in a neoliberal climate, which constructs some service users as a risk whilst simultaneously creating social conditions that are inimical to realising social work values. I contest that to affect long-term change, social workers must negotiate both the managerial imperatives of risk assessment processes whilst prioritising the actual needs of service users.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)181-187
    Number of pages7
    JournalEthics and Social Welfare
    Volume12
    Issue number2
    Early online date8 May 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Fingerprint

    subjectivity
    social work
    risk assessment
    social factors
    social worker
    moral philosophy
    climate
    human being
    Subjectivity
    Social Work
    Placement
    Social Workers
    Climate
    Person
    Risk Assessment
    Contests
    Compassion
    Susceptibility

    Keywords

    • care
    • relationship-based practice
    • risk
    • Social work

    Cite this

    Ferrier, Claire. / Risking Subjectivity in Everyday Social Work Practice. In: Ethics and Social Welfare. 2018 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 181-187.
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    Risking Subjectivity in Everyday Social Work Practice. / Ferrier, Claire.

    In: Ethics and Social Welfare, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2018, p. 181-187.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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