See what I'm saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers

Yunhan Wu, Daniel Rough, Anna Bleakley, Justin Edwards, Orla Cooney, Philip R. Doyle, Leigh Clark, Benjamin R. Cowan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Limited linguistic coverage for Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) means that many interact in a non-native language. Yet we know little about how IPAs currently support or hinder these users. Through native (L1) and non-native (L2) English speakers interacting with Google Assistant on a smartphone and smart speaker, we aim to understand this more deeply. Interviews revealed that L2 speakers prioritised utterance planning around perceived linguistic limitations, as opposed to L1 speakers prioritising succinctness because of system limitations. L2 speakers see IPAs as insensitive to linguistic needs resulting in failed interaction. L2 speakers clearly preferred using smartphones, as visual feedback supported diagnoses of communication breakdowns whilst allowing time to process query results. Conversely, L1 speakers preferred smart speakers, with audio feedback being seen as sufficient. We discuss the need to tailor the IPA experience for L2 users, emphasising visual feedback whilst reducing the burden of language production.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMobile HCI 2020
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020
Event22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services -
Duration: 5 Oct 20209 Oct 2020

Conference

Conference22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services
Period5/10/209/10/20

Keywords

  • speech interface
  • voice user interface
  • intelligent personal assistants
  • non-native speakers

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    Wu, Y., Rough, D., Bleakley, A., Edwards, J., Cooney, O., Doyle, P. R., Clark, L., & Cowan, B. R. (2020). See what I'm saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers. In Mobile HCI 2020 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). https://doi.org/10.1145/3379503.3403563