Separating distribution from coordination and computation as architectural dimensions

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The power of architectural modelling approaches in addressing the complexity of software systems derives, to a large extent, from the way they are able to separate coordination from computation concerns. However, distribution has become a key factor of complexity in the modelling of ubiquitous, software-intensive systems. Distribution interferes with both the way computations are performed and interactions are coordinated. Can we separate it as a third architectural dimension? If so, how can we derive the joint behaviour that emerges when the three dimensions are brought together? In this talk, we provide an overview of our joint work with Dr. Antónia Lopes, from the University of Lisbon, around Community - a prototype language for architectural description that provides a formal framework in which the questions above can be formulated and answered in general mathematical terms.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFormal Methods for Open Object-Based Distributed Systems
Subtitle of host publication8th IFIP WG 6.1 International Conference, FMOODS 2006, Proceedings
EditorsHeike Wehrheim, Roberto Gorrieri
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages17-17
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)9783540348955
ISBN (Print)9783540348931
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event8th IFIP WG 6.1 International Conference on Formal Methods for Open Object-Based Distributed Systems, FMOODS 2006 - Bologna, Italy
Duration: 14 Jun 200616 Jun 2006

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer
Volume4037
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference8th IFIP WG 6.1 International Conference on Formal Methods for Open Object-Based Distributed Systems, FMOODS 2006
CountryItaly
CityBologna
Period14/06/0616/06/06

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