Signal integration at the level of protein kinases, protein phosphatases and their substrates

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    263 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal integration in eukaryotic cells. It can be achieved through the phosphorylation of proteins that control the levels of second messengers, through the phosphorylation of protein kinases and phosphatases themselves, or through the reversible phosphorylation of their substrates. This article also highlights the important role of 'multi-site phosphorylation' in signal integration, in which different protein kinases produce additive, synergistic and antagonistic effects on activity by phosphorylating distinct Ser or Thr residues in a single protein.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)408-413
    Number of pages6
    JournalTrends in Biochemical Sciences
    Volume17
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 1992

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    Phosphorylation
    Phosphoprotein Phosphatases
    Protein Kinases
    Substrates
    Proteins
    Second Messenger Systems
    Eukaryotic Cells

    Cite this

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    Signal integration at the level of protein kinases, protein phosphatases and their substrates. / Cohen, Philip.

    In: Trends in Biochemical Sciences, Vol. 17, No. 10, 01.10.1992, p. 408-413.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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