"So that's what you see!"

building understanding with personalized simulations of colour vision deficiency

David R. Flatla, Carl Gutwin

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Colour vision deficiencies CVDaffect the everyday lives of a large number of people, but it is difficult for others-even friends and family members-to understand the experience of having CVD. Simulation tools can help provide this experience; however, current simulations are based on general models that have several limitations, and therefore cannot accurately reflect the perceptual capabilities of most individuals with reduced colour vision. To address this problem, we have developed a new simulation approach that is based on a specific empirical model of the actual colour perception abilities of a person with CVD. The resulting simulation is therefore a more exact representation of what a particular person with CVD actually sees. We tested the new approach in two ways. First, we compared its accuracy with that of the existing models, and found that the personalized simulations were significantly more accurate than the old method. Second, we asked pairs of participants one with CVD, and one close friend or family member without CVD to discuss images of everyday scenes that had been simulated with the CVD person's particular model. We found that the personalized simulations provided new insights into the details of the CVD person's experience. The personalized-simulation approach shows great promise for improving understanding of CVD and potentially other conditions for people with ordinary perceptual abilities.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
    Place of PublicationNew York, USA
    PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
    Pages167-174
    Number of pages8
    ISBN (Print)9781450313216
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 22 Oct 2012
    Event14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility - Millenium Harvest House Hotel, Boulder, Colorado, United States
    Duration: 22 Oct 201224 Oct 2012
    http://assets12.sigaccess.org/index.html

    Conference

    Conference14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
    Abbreviated titleASSETS 2012
    CountryUnited States
    CityBoulder, Colorado
    Period22/10/1224/10/12
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    Color vision
    Chemical vapor deposition
    Color

    Keywords

    • Colour vision deficiency
    • Colour vision simulation

    Cite this

    Flatla, D. R., & Gutwin, C. (2012). "So that's what you see!": building understanding with personalized simulations of colour vision deficiency. In ASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 167-174). New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2384916.2384946
    Flatla, David R. ; Gutwin, Carl. / "So that's what you see!" : building understanding with personalized simulations of colour vision deficiency. ASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. New York, USA : Association for Computing Machinery, 2012. pp. 167-174
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    abstract = "Colour vision deficiencies CVDaffect the everyday lives of a large number of people, but it is difficult for others-even friends and family members-to understand the experience of having CVD. Simulation tools can help provide this experience; however, current simulations are based on general models that have several limitations, and therefore cannot accurately reflect the perceptual capabilities of most individuals with reduced colour vision. To address this problem, we have developed a new simulation approach that is based on a specific empirical model of the actual colour perception abilities of a person with CVD. The resulting simulation is therefore a more exact representation of what a particular person with CVD actually sees. We tested the new approach in two ways. First, we compared its accuracy with that of the existing models, and found that the personalized simulations were significantly more accurate than the old method. Second, we asked pairs of participants one with CVD, and one close friend or family member without CVD to discuss images of everyday scenes that had been simulated with the CVD person's particular model. We found that the personalized simulations provided new insights into the details of the CVD person's experience. The personalized-simulation approach shows great promise for improving understanding of CVD and potentially other conditions for people with ordinary perceptual abilities.",
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    Flatla, DR & Gutwin, C 2012, "So that's what you see!": building understanding with personalized simulations of colour vision deficiency. in ASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. Association for Computing Machinery, New York, USA, pp. 167-174, 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, Boulder, Colorado, United States, 22/10/12. https://doi.org/10.1145/2384916.2384946

    "So that's what you see!" : building understanding with personalized simulations of colour vision deficiency. / Flatla, David R.; Gutwin, Carl.

    ASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. New York, USA : Association for Computing Machinery, 2012. p. 167-174.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    Flatla DR, Gutwin C. "So that's what you see!": building understanding with personalized simulations of colour vision deficiency. In ASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery. 2012. p. 167-174 https://doi.org/10.1145/2384916.2384946