Soundings

Gair Dunlop (Artist), Lona Kosik (Composer), Sam Richards (Composer)

Research output: Non-textual formDigital or Visual Products

Abstract

Human voices, young voices, expert voices, archive voices. Winds, waters, creatures, café sounds, aircraft … This film brings together elements of the two year AHRC funded research project on the North Norfolk Coast, exploring sonic democracies of coastal change. Composed sound interweaves with found sound, interview material, treated electronic sound and hydrophone recordings from the windfarms.

Perhaps one of the most surprising elements is the way in which the soundscape makes us realise that while we may be able to visually edit out intrusive, ‘non-natural’ elements, the evidence of the ear shows us that North Norfolk is a highly technologized landscape; fast jets on bombing runs to Holbeach, passenger aircraft, traffic, and sizzling burgers. Making this half-hour film has opened my eyes and ears, making me more aware of the fragility of coastal life. It’s also made clear the impossibility of separating environmental from social change.

FURTHER EXHIBITIONS OF THIS WORK :
18th February - 17th March 2019 10:00 -16:00 Norfolk Wildlife Trust Visitor Centre, Cley Marshes

Doreen Massey Annual Event, 27 March 2019 : Environmental Engagement and the Politics of Creative Practice FutureLearn, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP

Sounding Coastal Change Exhibition 18th February - 17th March 2019 2019 10:00 -16:00
Norfolk Wildlife Trust Visitor Centre, Cley Marshes

Sounding Coastal Change Exhibition Research Gallery, DJCAD 29th March-8th April 2019

Original languageEnglish
Media of outputFilm
Sizevariable
Publication statusPublished - 19 Oct 2018
EventNorwich Science festival - Norwich Forum, Norwich, United Kingdom
Duration: 19 Oct 201827 Jan 2019
https://norwichsciencefestival.co.uk/

Keywords

  • Art
  • music
  • environment
  • archive
  • site
  • ecology
  • coastal change
  • gentrification

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