Spiky sounds sparkling: How voiceless consonants present in the brand name of a beverage are more appropriate in conveying its carbonation strength

Abhishek Pathak (Lead / Corresponding author), Kosuke Motoki, Monin Techawachirakul, Gemma A. Calvert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research suggests that speech sounds within a brand name can influence taste expectations of a product (e.g., voiceless consonants are often linked to sour tastes). Though carbonated beverages are sold across all markets in the world, to date, linkages between the brand names and their carbonation expectation yet remains unexplored. This research investigates how specific speech sounds contained within a brand name can enhance the carbonation perception of a beverage. Across three studies, we demonstrate that hypothetical brand names (or pseudo words) containing voiceless consonants (p, k, t, f) are more associated with carbonated beverages and spikiness compared to voiced consonants (b, d, g, v), which are more associated with still water and roundedness. In the fourth study, we examine the coexisting role/effect of the orthographic and phonemic angularity of individual consonants (and phonemic sounds) and confirm that voiceless (vs. voiced) consonants (and phonemic sounds) are more associated with spikiness (vs. roundedness). Our findings add to the growing body of literature linking sound symbolism, taste expectations and cross-modal correspondences.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104404
Number of pages6
JournalFood Quality and Preference
Volume96
Early online date20 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Brand names
  • Consonants
  • Cross modal correspondences
  • Phonemes
  • Sound symbolism
  • Voiceless

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