Spiral laminar flow in the abdominal aorta: a predictor of renal impairment deterioration in patients with renal artery stenosis?

J. Graeme Houston, Stephen J. Gandy, Wendy Milne, John B. C. Dick, Jill J. F. Belch, Peter A. Stonebridge

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    40 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background. Spiral or helical arterial blood flow patterns have been widely observed in both animals and humans. The absence of spiral flow has been associated with carotid arterial disease. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of aortic spiral flow using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the relationship of the presence of spiral aortic flow with renal arterial disease and renal function in the follow-up of patients with suspected renal atheromatous disease. Methods. Prospective study of 100 patients with suspected renal arterial disease and 44 patient controls. Using a 1.5T MRI unit (Siemens Symphony), phase contrast flow quantification and three-dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography of the abdominal aorta were performed. Renal arterial stenoses (RAS) were classified minimal, moderate or severe. Renal function was followed at 3 months before and 6 months after MRI. Results. Non-spiral flow was more prevalent in patients with more severe RAS. Renal impairment progressed significantly in severe RAS without spiral flow (P = 0.0065), but did not progress significantly in severe RAS with spiral flow (P = 0.12). In minimal or moderate RAS with or without spiral flow there was no significant progression (P = 0.16, 0.13, 0.47, 0.092, respectively). Conclusions. Aortic spiral blood flow can be assessed with MRI. Lack of aortic spiral blood flow in patients with severe RAS is associated with significant short-term renal function deterioration. Determination of blood flow patterns may be a useful indicator of renal impairment progression in patients with suspected renal artery stenosis.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1786-1791
    Number of pages6
    JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
    Volume19
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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    Renal Artery Obstruction
    Abdominal Aorta
    Kidney
    Pathologic Constriction
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Carotid Artery Diseases

    Keywords

    • Aorta
    • Kidney diseases etiology
    • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
    • MRI
    • Renal artery obstruction complications
    • Renal artery obstruction physiopathology
    • Stenosis
    • Abdominal physiopathology

    Cite this

    @article{f598c0a84f764180be506e9d6574dfd4,
    title = "Spiral laminar flow in the abdominal aorta: a predictor of renal impairment deterioration in patients with renal artery stenosis?",
    abstract = "Background. Spiral or helical arterial blood flow patterns have been widely observed in both animals and humans. The absence of spiral flow has been associated with carotid arterial disease. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of aortic spiral flow using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the relationship of the presence of spiral aortic flow with renal arterial disease and renal function in the follow-up of patients with suspected renal atheromatous disease. Methods. Prospective study of 100 patients with suspected renal arterial disease and 44 patient controls. Using a 1.5T MRI unit (Siemens Symphony), phase contrast flow quantification and three-dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography of the abdominal aorta were performed. Renal arterial stenoses (RAS) were classified minimal, moderate or severe. Renal function was followed at 3 months before and 6 months after MRI. Results. Non-spiral flow was more prevalent in patients with more severe RAS. Renal impairment progressed significantly in severe RAS without spiral flow (P = 0.0065), but did not progress significantly in severe RAS with spiral flow (P = 0.12). In minimal or moderate RAS with or without spiral flow there was no significant progression (P = 0.16, 0.13, 0.47, 0.092, respectively). Conclusions. Aortic spiral blood flow can be assessed with MRI. Lack of aortic spiral blood flow in patients with severe RAS is associated with significant short-term renal function deterioration. Determination of blood flow patterns may be a useful indicator of renal impairment progression in patients with suspected renal artery stenosis.",
    keywords = "Aorta, Kidney diseases etiology, Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI, Renal artery obstruction complications, Renal artery obstruction physiopathology, Stenosis, Abdominal physiopathology",
    author = "Houston, {J. Graeme} and Gandy, {Stephen J.} and Wendy Milne and Dick, {John B. C.} and Belch, {Jill J. F.} and Stonebridge, {Peter A.}",
    note = "dc.publisher: Oxford University Press",
    year = "2004",
    doi = "10.1093/ndt/gfh238",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "1786--1791",
    journal = "Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation",
    issn = "0931-0509",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "7",

    }

    Spiral laminar flow in the abdominal aorta: a predictor of renal impairment deterioration in patients with renal artery stenosis? / Houston, J. Graeme; Gandy, Stephen J.; Milne, Wendy; Dick, John B. C.; Belch, Jill J. F.; Stonebridge, Peter A.

    In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Vol. 19, No. 7, 2004, p. 1786-1791.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Spiral laminar flow in the abdominal aorta: a predictor of renal impairment deterioration in patients with renal artery stenosis?

    AU - Houston, J. Graeme

    AU - Gandy, Stephen J.

    AU - Milne, Wendy

    AU - Dick, John B. C.

    AU - Belch, Jill J. F.

    AU - Stonebridge, Peter A.

    N1 - dc.publisher: Oxford University Press

    PY - 2004

    Y1 - 2004

    N2 - Background. Spiral or helical arterial blood flow patterns have been widely observed in both animals and humans. The absence of spiral flow has been associated with carotid arterial disease. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of aortic spiral flow using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the relationship of the presence of spiral aortic flow with renal arterial disease and renal function in the follow-up of patients with suspected renal atheromatous disease. Methods. Prospective study of 100 patients with suspected renal arterial disease and 44 patient controls. Using a 1.5T MRI unit (Siemens Symphony), phase contrast flow quantification and three-dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography of the abdominal aorta were performed. Renal arterial stenoses (RAS) were classified minimal, moderate or severe. Renal function was followed at 3 months before and 6 months after MRI. Results. Non-spiral flow was more prevalent in patients with more severe RAS. Renal impairment progressed significantly in severe RAS without spiral flow (P = 0.0065), but did not progress significantly in severe RAS with spiral flow (P = 0.12). In minimal or moderate RAS with or without spiral flow there was no significant progression (P = 0.16, 0.13, 0.47, 0.092, respectively). Conclusions. Aortic spiral blood flow can be assessed with MRI. Lack of aortic spiral blood flow in patients with severe RAS is associated with significant short-term renal function deterioration. Determination of blood flow patterns may be a useful indicator of renal impairment progression in patients with suspected renal artery stenosis.

    AB - Background. Spiral or helical arterial blood flow patterns have been widely observed in both animals and humans. The absence of spiral flow has been associated with carotid arterial disease. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of aortic spiral flow using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the relationship of the presence of spiral aortic flow with renal arterial disease and renal function in the follow-up of patients with suspected renal atheromatous disease. Methods. Prospective study of 100 patients with suspected renal arterial disease and 44 patient controls. Using a 1.5T MRI unit (Siemens Symphony), phase contrast flow quantification and three-dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography of the abdominal aorta were performed. Renal arterial stenoses (RAS) were classified minimal, moderate or severe. Renal function was followed at 3 months before and 6 months after MRI. Results. Non-spiral flow was more prevalent in patients with more severe RAS. Renal impairment progressed significantly in severe RAS without spiral flow (P = 0.0065), but did not progress significantly in severe RAS with spiral flow (P = 0.12). In minimal or moderate RAS with or without spiral flow there was no significant progression (P = 0.16, 0.13, 0.47, 0.092, respectively). Conclusions. Aortic spiral blood flow can be assessed with MRI. Lack of aortic spiral blood flow in patients with severe RAS is associated with significant short-term renal function deterioration. Determination of blood flow patterns may be a useful indicator of renal impairment progression in patients with suspected renal artery stenosis.

    KW - Aorta

    KW - Kidney diseases etiology

    KW - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    KW - MRI

    KW - Renal artery obstruction complications

    KW - Renal artery obstruction physiopathology

    KW - Stenosis

    KW - Abdominal physiopathology

    U2 - 10.1093/ndt/gfh238

    DO - 10.1093/ndt/gfh238

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 15161949

    VL - 19

    SP - 1786

    EP - 1791

    JO - Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

    JF - Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

    SN - 0931-0509

    IS - 7

    ER -