Summary of: an in vitro investigation of the erosive potential of smoothies

S. M. Blacker, R. G. Chadwick

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Introduction Recent health promotion campaigns have encouraged the public to consume at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day. Many see consuming fruit smoothies as a way of achieving this. Objective To ascertain the potential or otherwise for fruit smoothies to bring about dental erosion. Design Laboratory study. Method This was an in vitro investigation in which five varieties of shop bought fruit smoothies, including a 'thickie' were investigated, with respect to their initial pH, titratable acidity and effect upon exposure to the surface microhardness and profile of extracted human teeth. In addition their performance was compared to negative (Volvic (TM) water) and positive (orange juice) control drinks as well as a homemade smoothie, based upon the recipe of one of the commercially bought drinks, from which ingredient omissions were made. Results The majority of the drinks investigated had a baseline pH below the critical pH of enamel (5.5) and required comparable volumes of 0.1M NaOH to raise their pH to neutrality as the positive control. Only two drinks (Volvic (TM) still mineral water, the negative control, and the yoghurt, vanilla bean and honey 'thickie') displayed a higher pH, though to neutralise the thickie, a lesser quantity of alkali addition was required. The immersion of the tooth samples in the drinks brought about reductions in their surface hardness (expressed as a percentage change of median hardness) but these were only significant (p

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)172-173
    Number of pages2
    JournalBritish Dental Journal
    Volume214
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Cite this