Teaching for transformation: higher education institutions, critical pedagogy and the political imagination

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Writing over 20 years ago, bell hooks (1994) highlighted her concerns that the dominant discourse on teaching portrayed it as the dreary underdog of academic practice, with research being the jewel in the academic crown. Needs and expectations of students and of future employers are changing; to succeed in this increasingly competitive market, we argue that universities will need to undertake a drastic move away from transmission methods of teaching to approaches that inspire the political imagination. We believe that as educators our ontological and epistemological perspectives underpin our teaching; our positions inform our understanding of historical, economic and social structures and, for us, determine how we view our role as educators. Our ontological commitment to social justice affects what we teach, how we teach and how we approach and interpret the space of the classroom. They inform who we are as humans and determine what we see, how we see it and how we choose to interpret it. In the same way that there has been increasing recognition within the social sciences of the need to examine how our ontologies influence, direct and alter our research, we argue that we must do the same with our teaching in order to create learning environments that engender critical political engagement. This interactive discussion will facilitate a reflection on the role of scholarship in developing this political imagination. We hope to provoke dialogue on ways in which we can avoid reactionary changes to teaching as a result of the shifting expectations of students and employers while meeting the demand for social impact through creative, critical pedagogies that recognise the potential role of educators in social transformation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jul 2017
EventBuilding Bridges in a Complex World - Chania, Greece
Duration: 6 Jul 20178 Jul 2017
https://www.buildingbridges.uk.com/

Conference

ConferenceBuilding Bridges in a Complex World
CountryGreece
CityChania
Period6/07/178/07/17
Internet address

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educator
Teaching
education
employer
method of teaching
economic structure
social effects
social structure
ontology
social justice
learning environment
student
social science
dialogue
commitment
classroom
imagination
university
discourse
demand

Cite this

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title = "Teaching for transformation: higher education institutions, critical pedagogy and the political imagination",
abstract = "Writing over 20 years ago, bell hooks (1994) highlighted her concerns that the dominant discourse on teaching portrayed it as the dreary underdog of academic practice, with research being the jewel in the academic crown. Needs and expectations of students and of future employers are changing; to succeed in this increasingly competitive market, we argue that universities will need to undertake a drastic move away from transmission methods of teaching to approaches that inspire the political imagination. We believe that as educators our ontological and epistemological perspectives underpin our teaching; our positions inform our understanding of historical, economic and social structures and, for us, determine how we view our role as educators. Our ontological commitment to social justice affects what we teach, how we teach and how we approach and interpret the space of the classroom. They inform who we are as humans and determine what we see, how we see it and how we choose to interpret it. In the same way that there has been increasing recognition within the social sciences of the need to examine how our ontologies influence, direct and alter our research, we argue that we must do the same with our teaching in order to create learning environments that engender critical political engagement. This interactive discussion will facilitate a reflection on the role of scholarship in developing this political imagination. We hope to provoke dialogue on ways in which we can avoid reactionary changes to teaching as a result of the shifting expectations of students and employers while meeting the demand for social impact through creative, critical pedagogies that recognise the potential role of educators in social transformation.",
author = "{Jupp Kina}, Victoria and Jean McEwan-Short",
year = "2017",
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note = "Building Bridges in a Complex World ; Conference date: 06-07-2017 Through 08-07-2017",
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Jupp Kina, V & McEwan-Short, J 2017, 'Teaching for transformation: higher education institutions, critical pedagogy and the political imagination', Paper presented at Building Bridges in a Complex World, Chania, Greece, 6/07/17 - 8/07/17.

Teaching for transformation : higher education institutions, critical pedagogy and the political imagination. / Jupp Kina, Victoria; McEwan-Short, Jean.

2017. Paper presented at Building Bridges in a Complex World, Chania, Greece.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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