Teaching, reflecting, and learning: The value of an intercalated medical education programme

Fiona Muir (Lead / Corresponding author), Jack Bruce, Kevin McConville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Teaching programmes within medicine focus primarily on pathways of a shorter length with little regard to teaching lasting longer than a month. This study is different from other studies as it examines the benefits of a nine month-long medical education degree programme and its impact beyond graduation. This study set out to explore the impact of a medical education intercalated degree programme for its graduates and their careers.

Methods: A small scale, exploratory qualitative case study was conducted with 10 graduates of an intercalated degree programme.

Results: The findings highlight the longer term value of an intercalated degree programme with particular emphasis on academic and personal skills; research and teaching skills; independence and confidence; its impact on future practice and the notion that 'student as teacher' programmes are a valuable asset to medical education as a whole. Participants advocated more teaching opportunities as a core longitudinal teaching component in preparation for the teaching responsibilities in their working lives.

Conclusions: The programme enables the development of a range of academic and personal skills, with particular emphasis on research and teaching skills, independence and confidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-528
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Integrated
  • medical education research
  • undergraduate
  • continuing medicine
  • medicine
  • continuing

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