The beaded filament of the eye lens: An unexpected key to intermediate filament structure and function

Roy A. Quinlan, Jane M. Carter, Aileen Sandilands, Alan R. Prescott

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1959, an unusual filamentous polymer, now called the beaded filament, was described in the lens of the eye. The constituent proteins, assembly properties and functions of the beaded filament have been elusive. The recent publication of the sequences for two major lens filament proteins (CP49 and filensin) and the reconstitution in vitro of structures closely resembling beaded filaments, suggests that the beaded filament is related structurally to intermediate filaments (Ifs). The association of the lenticular chaperones, the α-crystallins, with the filament contributes to the characteristic beaded morphology, as well as giving important clues to the function of this unuszlal filament in the lens. These recent results have several implications for IF function and assembly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-126
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Cell Biology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1996

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The beaded filament of the eye lens: An unexpected key to intermediate filament structure and function'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this