The bowel cancer awareness campaign 'Be Clear on Cancer': sustained increased pressure on resources and over-accessed by higher social grades with no increase in cancer detected

S. J. Hall (Lead / Corresponding author), J. D. H. Peacock, L. A. Cochrane, O. Peacock, G. M. Tierney, S. I. H. Tou, J. N. Lund

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of the national 'Be Clear on Cancer' bowel cancer reminder campaign on service and diagnosis at a single UK institution. Secondly, to evaluate the socio-economic background of patients referred before and after the reminder campaign compared with the regional demographic.

    METHOD: Suspected cancer 2-week wait patients in the 3 months precampaign, postcampaign and after the reminder campaign were included. Demographics, investigations and diagnosis were recorded. The postcode was used to allocate a National Readership Survey social grade.

    RESULTS: Three hundred and eighty-three referrals were received in the 3 months precampaign, 550 postcampaign and 470 postreminder campaign. There were significant increases in the monthly referral rates following the campaign (P < 0.001 in both the post- and postreminder periods). Significantly more patients from social grades AB and C1C2 than expected from regional demographics were referred precampaign and after the reminder campaign (P < 0.001 in each case). There were no significant differences between the proportions of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the three study periods (P = 0.710).

    CONCLUSION: The 'Be Clear on Cancer' bowel cancer campaign has had a significant sustained impact on resources. It has failed to increase referrals among lower socio-economic grades, leading to an increase in 'worried well' referrals and no change in numbers, or the stage, of colorectal cancers diagnosed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)195-199
    Number of pages5
    JournalColorectal Disease
    Volume18
    Issue number2
    Early online date31 Aug 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

    Keywords

    • Adult
    • Aged
    • Aged, 80 and over
    • Colorectal neoplasms
    • Early detection of cancer
    • England
    • Female
    • Health promotion
    • Health resources
    • Health services needs and demand
    • Humans
    • Male
    • Middle aged
    • Referral and consultation
    • Social class
    • Journal article

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