The Brussels II Regulation: how the European Community has moved into family law

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    On 1 March 2001 Council Regulation (EC) No 1347/2000 of 29 May 2000 on Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments in Matrimonial Matters and in Matters of Parental Responsibility for Children of both Spouses (Brussels II) entered into force.1 In the United Kingdom at least this significant step went relatively unnoticed. Nevertheless, the Regulation marks a new departure for the European Community and is likely to be but the first in a series of instruments dealing with family law issues. This article will use an analysis of the evolution of the Brussels II initiative to explore how and why the European Community has been able to move into an area not innately associated with traditional European goals.2 It will then reflect on the wider impact of the Regulation and any future initiatives for private international law and family law in Europe.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)883-908
    Number of pages26
    JournalInternational and Comparative Law Quarterly
    Volume51
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2002

    Keywords

    • Family law
    • Private international law
    • Brussels II Regulation
    • Europe

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Brussels II Regulation: how the European Community has moved into family law'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this