The changing view of eukaryogenesis - fossils, cells, lineages and how they all come together

Joel B. Dacks, Mark C. Field, Roger Buick, Laura Eme, Simonetta Gribaldo, Andrew J. Roger, Céline Brochier-Armanet, Damien P. Devos (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

27 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Eukaryogenesis - the emergence of eukaryotic cells - represents a pivotal evolutionary event. With a fundamentally more complex cellular plan compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes are major contributors to most aspects of life on Earth. For decades, we have understood that eukaryotic origins lie within both the Archaea domain and α-Proteobacteria. However, it is much less clear when, and from which precise ancestors, eukaryotes originated, or the order of emergence of distinctive eukaryotic cellular features. Many competing models for eukaryogenesis have been proposed, but until recently, the absence of discriminatory data meant that a consensus was elusive. Recent advances in paleogeology, phylogenetics, cell biology and microbial diversity, particularly the discovery of the 'Candidatus Lokiarcheaota' phylum, are now providing new insights into these aspects of eukaryogenesis. The new data have allowed finessing the time frame during which the events of eukaryogenesis occurred, a more precise identification of the contributing lineages and their likely biological features. The new data have allowed finessing of the time frame during which the events of eukaryogenesis occurred, a more precise identification of the contributing lineages and clarification of their probable biological features.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3695-3703
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume129
Issue number20
Early online date30 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2016

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Cell Lineage
Eukaryota
Proteobacteria
Archaea
Eukaryotic Cells
Cell Biology
finesse

Keywords

  • Eukaryogenesis
  • Evolution
  • Archaea
  • Molecular fossil
  • Molecular dating
  • Last eukaryotic common ancestor
  • Chemical fossil
  • Endosymbiosis
  • Archaeogenesis
  • First eukaryotic common ancestor

Cite this

Dacks, J. B., Field, M. C., Buick, R., Eme, L., Gribaldo, S., Roger, A. J., ... Devos, D. P. (2016). The changing view of eukaryogenesis - fossils, cells, lineages and how they all come together. Journal of Cell Science, 129(20), 3695-3703. https://doi.org/10.1242/jcs.178566
Dacks, Joel B. ; Field, Mark C. ; Buick, Roger ; Eme, Laura ; Gribaldo, Simonetta ; Roger, Andrew J. ; Brochier-Armanet, Céline ; Devos, Damien P. / The changing view of eukaryogenesis - fossils, cells, lineages and how they all come together. In: Journal of Cell Science. 2016 ; Vol. 129, No. 20. pp. 3695-3703.
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Dacks, JB, Field, MC, Buick, R, Eme, L, Gribaldo, S, Roger, AJ, Brochier-Armanet, C & Devos, DP 2016, 'The changing view of eukaryogenesis - fossils, cells, lineages and how they all come together', Journal of Cell Science, vol. 129, no. 20, pp. 3695-3703. https://doi.org/10.1242/jcs.178566

The changing view of eukaryogenesis - fossils, cells, lineages and how they all come together. / Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.; Buick, Roger; Eme, Laura; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Roger, Andrew J.; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Devos, Damien P. (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 129, No. 20, 15.10.2016, p. 3695-3703.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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AU - Dacks, Joel B.

AU - Field, Mark C.

AU - Buick, Roger

AU - Eme, Laura

AU - Gribaldo, Simonetta

AU - Roger, Andrew J.

AU - Brochier-Armanet, Céline

AU - Devos, Damien P.

N1 - D.P.D. is supported by the Consejerıa de Economia, Innovacion, Ciencia y Empleo, Junta de Andalucıa C2A program; and the Spanish Ministerio de Economıa y Competitividad [grant number BFU2013-40866-P]. J.B.D. is supported as the Canada Research Chair (Tier II; Government of Canada) in Evolutionary Cell Biology.

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N2 - Eukaryogenesis - the emergence of eukaryotic cells - represents a pivotal evolutionary event. With a fundamentally more complex cellular plan compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes are major contributors to most aspects of life on Earth. For decades, we have understood that eukaryotic origins lie within both the Archaea domain and α-Proteobacteria. However, it is much less clear when, and from which precise ancestors, eukaryotes originated, or the order of emergence of distinctive eukaryotic cellular features. Many competing models for eukaryogenesis have been proposed, but until recently, the absence of discriminatory data meant that a consensus was elusive. Recent advances in paleogeology, phylogenetics, cell biology and microbial diversity, particularly the discovery of the 'Candidatus Lokiarcheaota' phylum, are now providing new insights into these aspects of eukaryogenesis. The new data have allowed finessing the time frame during which the events of eukaryogenesis occurred, a more precise identification of the contributing lineages and their likely biological features. The new data have allowed finessing of the time frame during which the events of eukaryogenesis occurred, a more precise identification of the contributing lineages and clarification of their probable biological features.

AB - Eukaryogenesis - the emergence of eukaryotic cells - represents a pivotal evolutionary event. With a fundamentally more complex cellular plan compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes are major contributors to most aspects of life on Earth. For decades, we have understood that eukaryotic origins lie within both the Archaea domain and α-Proteobacteria. However, it is much less clear when, and from which precise ancestors, eukaryotes originated, or the order of emergence of distinctive eukaryotic cellular features. Many competing models for eukaryogenesis have been proposed, but until recently, the absence of discriminatory data meant that a consensus was elusive. Recent advances in paleogeology, phylogenetics, cell biology and microbial diversity, particularly the discovery of the 'Candidatus Lokiarcheaota' phylum, are now providing new insights into these aspects of eukaryogenesis. The new data have allowed finessing the time frame during which the events of eukaryogenesis occurred, a more precise identification of the contributing lineages and their likely biological features. The new data have allowed finessing of the time frame during which the events of eukaryogenesis occurred, a more precise identification of the contributing lineages and clarification of their probable biological features.

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KW - Molecular dating

KW - Last eukaryotic common ancestor

KW - Chemical fossil

KW - Endosymbiosis

KW - Archaeogenesis

KW - First eukaryotic common ancestor

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DO - 10.1242/jcs.178566

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SP - 3695

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