The Commonwealth, the Balance of Payments and the Politics of International Poverty: British Aid Policy, 1958-1971

Jim Tomlinson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Development aid became a significant feature of British foreign and economic policy from the late 1950s. While giving a chronological account of policy developments in this field down to the publication of the Pearson report of 1971, this article is organised around three predominant themes. First, aid has to be seen in the context of Commonwealth relations, with the Commonwealth as both the major recipient of British aid and the main context in which it was organised and discussed. Second, policies on aid were closely tied to developments in policy on the balance of payments, the perceived state of which consistently influenced the volume of aid-giving. Finally, aid policy was part of a complex international debate about the concept of ‘need’, which at least in part shaped who were to be the recipients of aid, and at the same time about the proper measure of the ‘burden’ of aid which helped to shape the policy of the main givers
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)413-429
    Number of pages17
    JournalContemporary European History
    Volume12
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2003

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