The developing juvenile talus: Radiographic identification of distinct ontogenetic phases and structural trajectories

Rebecca A. G. Reid (Lead / Corresponding author), Catriona Davies, Craig Cunningham

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Abstract

Trabecular bone architecture in the developing skeleton is a widely researched area of bone biomechanics; however, despite its significance in weight-bearing locomotion, the developing talus has received limited examination. This study investigates the talus with the purpose of identifying ontogenetic phases and developmental patterns that contribute to the growing understanding of the developing juvenile skeleton. Colour gradient mapping and radiographic absorptiometry were utilised to investigate 62 human tali from 38 individuals, ranging in age-at-death from 28 weeks intrauterine to 20 years of age. The perinatal talus exhibited a rudimentary pattern comparable to the structural organisation observed within the late adolescent talus. This early internal organisation is hypothesised to be related to the vascular pattern of the talus. After 2 years of age, the talus demonstrated refinement, where radiographic trajectories progressively developed into patterns consistent with adult trabecular organisation, which are linked to the forces associated with the bipedal gait, suggesting a strong influence of biomechanical forces on the development of the talus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-95
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Anatomy
Volume244
Issue number1
Early online date9 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2024

Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • bone
  • development
  • juvenile
  • radiography
  • talus
  • trabeculae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Anatomy
  • Cell Biology
  • Histology
  • Developmental Biology

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