The effect of social deprivation and gender on self-efficacy beliefs about the postsecondary transition

Walter Douglas (Lead / Corresponding author), Keith James Topping

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Abstract

Introduction: High school students’ self-efficacy beliefs about their ability to successfully obtain a first postsecondary destination in employment, education or training, and the learning sources of these beliefs were examined.

Method:  Factor analysis of an inventory administered to 1044 high school students (573 males and 471 females) who attended six urban schools identified five factors.

Results:  ANOVA indicated that students living in areas of higher deprivation reported significantly lower levels of positive postsecondary destination self-efficacy belief, and less experience of vicarious career success. Males reported less personal experience of career success than females but higher levels of positive postsecondary destination self-efficacy belief (particularly at higher levels of deprivation). Males reported greater experience of positive career-related emotional arousal.

Discussion and Conclusion: These results may contribute to an explanation of why failure to obtain a positive postsecondary destination is more prevalent in young people living in areas of greater social deprivation, and in males rather than females. The implications for practice, policy and future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)399-424
Number of pages26
JournalElectronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology
Volume18
Issue number52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • autoeficacia
  • experiencias de aprendizaje
  • learning experiences
  • postsecondary transition
  • self-efficacy
  • social cognitive career theory
  • teoría de la carrera cognitiva social
  • transición postsecundaria

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