The epidemiology of hyperprolactinaemia over 20 years in the Tayside region of Scotland: The Prolactin Epidemiology, Audit, and Research Study (PROLEARS)

Enrique Soto-Pedre (Lead / Corresponding author), Paul J. Newey, John S. Bevan, Neil Greig, Graham P. Leese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and incidence of hyperprolactinaemia. Hyperprolactinaemia is a common problem in endocrine practice, but its epidemiology has not been accurately established.

STUDY DESIGN: A population-based retrospective follow up study in Tayside, Scotland (population 400,000) from 1993 to 2013.

PATIENTS: Record-linkage technology (biochemistry, prescribing, hospital admissions, radiology, mortality and maternity data) was used to identify all patients with a serum prolactin measurement. From these, cases were defined as those with a prolactin greater than 1000mU/L (47.2ng/ml) or at least three prescriptions for a dopamine agonist.

MEASUREMENTS: Number of prevalent and incident cases of hyperprolactinaemia per calendar year by age, sex and cause of hyperprolactinaemia.

RESULTS: A total of 32,289 patients had a serum prolactin assay undertaken, of which 1,301 had hyperprolactinaemia not related to pregnancy: 25.6% patients were pituitary-disorder 45.9% drug-induced, 7.5% related to macroprolactin, and 6.1% related to hypothyroidism, leaving 15.0% idiopathic. Over the 20 years there was a fourfold increase in the number of prolactin assays performed and prevalence of hyperprolactinaemia was initially 0.02%, but rose to 0.23% by 2013. Overall incidence was 13.8 cases per 100,000 person-years (20.6 in 2008-13) and was 3.5 times higher in women than in men. The highest rates were found in women aged 25-44 years. Drug-induced causes tripled during the 20 years.

CONCLUSIONS: Rising prevalence of hyperprolactinaemia is probably due to increased ascertainment and increased incidence of psychoactive drug-related causes. Rates are higher in women than in men but only before the age of 65 years. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-67
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume86
Issue number1
Early online date19 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

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