The Impact of Medications on Quality of Life in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

A Systematic Review

David Coghill

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    48 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Quality of life (QOL) describes an individual's subjective perception of their position in life as evidenced by their physical, psychological and social functioning. Although an established outcome measure in physical health, QOL has more recently become an increasingly important measure in mental health clinical work and research. This article reviews the evidence describing the impact of medications on QOL in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Databases were searched for research studies describing the effects of medication on QOL in ADHD: 25 relevant studies were identified. Most (n = 20) of these studies have focused on children and adolescents, and most have investigated a single molecule, atomoxetine (n= 15), with relatively few studies investigating methylphenidate (n = 5), amfetamines (n = 4) and manifaxine (n = 1).

    These studies support a positive short-term effect of medication on QOL in ADHD for children, adolescents and adults that mirrors, to some extent, the effects of these medications on ADHD symptoms, although with smaller effect sizes. Notwithstanding measurement issues, it will continue to be important that those designing and conducting clinical trials in ADHD, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, continue to include measures of QOL as secondary outcome measures. In particular, information about QOL effects in adults and in subjects of all ages taking methylphenidate and amfetamine treatments is urgently needed. The lack of systematic studies of the impact on QOL of psychological therapies, either on their own or in multimodal combinations with medication, is a serious omission that should be urgently addressed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)843-866
    Number of pages24
    JournalCNS Drugs
    Volume24
    Issue number10
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT DISORDER
    • HEALTH STATE UTILITIES
    • DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY-DISORDER
    • ATOMOXETINE TREATMENT
    • MENTAL-DISORDERS
    • UNITED-KINGDOM
    • DOUBLE-BLIND
    • CHILDREN
    • ADOLESCENTS
    • ADHD

    Cite this

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    The Impact of Medications on Quality of Life in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder : A Systematic Review. / Coghill, David.

    In: CNS Drugs, Vol. 24, No. 10, 2010, p. 843-866.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The Impact of Medications on Quality of Life in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    T2 - A Systematic Review

    AU - Coghill, David

    PY - 2010

    Y1 - 2010

    N2 - Quality of life (QOL) describes an individual's subjective perception of their position in life as evidenced by their physical, psychological and social functioning. Although an established outcome measure in physical health, QOL has more recently become an increasingly important measure in mental health clinical work and research. This article reviews the evidence describing the impact of medications on QOL in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Databases were searched for research studies describing the effects of medication on QOL in ADHD: 25 relevant studies were identified. Most (n = 20) of these studies have focused on children and adolescents, and most have investigated a single molecule, atomoxetine (n= 15), with relatively few studies investigating methylphenidate (n = 5), amfetamines (n = 4) and manifaxine (n = 1).These studies support a positive short-term effect of medication on QOL in ADHD for children, adolescents and adults that mirrors, to some extent, the effects of these medications on ADHD symptoms, although with smaller effect sizes. Notwithstanding measurement issues, it will continue to be important that those designing and conducting clinical trials in ADHD, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, continue to include measures of QOL as secondary outcome measures. In particular, information about QOL effects in adults and in subjects of all ages taking methylphenidate and amfetamine treatments is urgently needed. The lack of systematic studies of the impact on QOL of psychological therapies, either on their own or in multimodal combinations with medication, is a serious omission that should be urgently addressed.

    AB - Quality of life (QOL) describes an individual's subjective perception of their position in life as evidenced by their physical, psychological and social functioning. Although an established outcome measure in physical health, QOL has more recently become an increasingly important measure in mental health clinical work and research. This article reviews the evidence describing the impact of medications on QOL in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Databases were searched for research studies describing the effects of medication on QOL in ADHD: 25 relevant studies were identified. Most (n = 20) of these studies have focused on children and adolescents, and most have investigated a single molecule, atomoxetine (n= 15), with relatively few studies investigating methylphenidate (n = 5), amfetamines (n = 4) and manifaxine (n = 1).These studies support a positive short-term effect of medication on QOL in ADHD for children, adolescents and adults that mirrors, to some extent, the effects of these medications on ADHD symptoms, although with smaller effect sizes. Notwithstanding measurement issues, it will continue to be important that those designing and conducting clinical trials in ADHD, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, continue to include measures of QOL as secondary outcome measures. In particular, information about QOL effects in adults and in subjects of all ages taking methylphenidate and amfetamine treatments is urgently needed. The lack of systematic studies of the impact on QOL of psychological therapies, either on their own or in multimodal combinations with medication, is a serious omission that should be urgently addressed.

    KW - OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT DISORDER

    KW - HEALTH STATE UTILITIES

    KW - DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY-DISORDER

    KW - ATOMOXETINE TREATMENT

    KW - MENTAL-DISORDERS

    KW - UNITED-KINGDOM

    KW - DOUBLE-BLIND

    KW - CHILDREN

    KW - ADOLESCENTS

    KW - ADHD

    M3 - Review article

    VL - 24

    SP - 843

    EP - 866

    JO - CNS Drugs

    JF - CNS Drugs

    SN - 1172-7047

    IS - 10

    ER -