The Inscription of Terrorism

Philip Roth's American Pastoral

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Drawing on interviews and essays in which Roth has discussed how he perceives his place in literature and in society, the author argues that American Pastoral highlights the affinity between the writer and the terrorist as creative and destructive agents of change. By paying close attention to the book's formal complexities, the author concludes that Zuckerman's seeming identification with Seymour Levov is deceptive, and the narrator is idealogically more understanding of the terrorist daughter than he is of her "depthless" father.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)101-113
    Number of pages13
    JournalPhilip Roth Studies
    Volume3
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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    Philip Roth
    Terrorist
    Terrorism
    Narrator
    Affinity
    Writer
    Daughters

    Cite this

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    title = "The Inscription of Terrorism: Philip Roth's American Pastoral",
    abstract = "Drawing on interviews and essays in which Roth has discussed how he perceives his place in literature and in society, the author argues that American Pastoral highlights the affinity between the writer and the terrorist as creative and destructive agents of change. By paying close attention to the book's formal complexities, the author concludes that Zuckerman's seeming identification with Seymour Levov is deceptive, and the narrator is idealogically more understanding of the terrorist daughter than he is of her {"}depthless{"} father.",
    author = "Aliki Varvogli",
    note = "Taken from letter dated 19th Feb 2012 This is to indicate that Dr. Aliki Varvogli’s essay, “The Inscription of Terrorism: Philip Roth’s American Pastoral,” appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Philip Roth Studies (volume 3, number 2). Normally our fall issues are finalized and out in print by December of the year indicated on the cover, but with the issue in which Dr. Varvogli’s essay appeared, we were late in finalizing all of the mansucripts. As such, the issue that is marked as Fall 2007 did not actually come out in print until the beginning of 2008. Derek Parker Royal Executive Editor, Philip Roth Studies 308-293-1433 rothstudies@rothsociety.org",
    year = "2008",
    language = "English",
    volume = "3",
    pages = "101--113",
    journal = "Philip Roth Studies",
    issn = "1547-3929",
    publisher = "Purdue University Press",
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    The Inscription of Terrorism : Philip Roth's American Pastoral. / Varvogli, Aliki.

    In: Philip Roth Studies, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2008, p. 101-113.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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