The isothiocyanate sulforaphane induces the phase 2 response by signaling of the Keap1-Nrf2-are pathway: Implications for dietary protection against cancer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the course of evolution, all eukaryotes have developed sophisticated defense systems that allow their survival and coevolution with other competing organisms. These include the biosynthesis of a wide array of small molecules (secondary metabolites) with extraordinarily sophisticated chemistry in plants, as well as elaborate enzymatic systems capable of coping with the toxicities of electrophiles and oxidants (phase 2 enzymes) in both plants and animals. Phase 2 enzymes catalyze enormously versatile chemical reactions that collectively lead to detoxification of various electrophiles and oxidants. Together with housekeeping antioxidant enzymes (e.g., catalase, superoxide dismutase) and small molecular mass direct antioxidants (e.g, ascorbic acid, tocopherol, glutathione), phase 2 enzymes constitute an integral part of the cellular defense. Furthermore, the discoveries that (1) phase 2 enzymes can be induced selectively (without concomitant induction of phase 1 enzymes) by a wide variety of stimuli that we now simply call “inducers” and (2) this “induced state” that we now refer to as “the phase 2 response” could explain how so many diverse chemical agents could block carcinogenesis in various animal models led to the birth of the hypothesis that induction of phase 2 enzymes could be a powerful strategy for protection against cancer and other chronic diseases [1-3].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDietary Modulation of Cell Signaling Pathways
EditorsYoung-Joon Surh, Zigang Dong, Enrique Cadenas, Lester Packer
PublisherCRC Press
Pages205-227
Number of pages23
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9780849381492
ISBN (Print)9780849381485
Publication statusPublished - 26 Sep 2008

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Enzymes
Neoplasms
Oxidants
Animals
Antioxidants
Housekeeping
Detoxification
Tocopherols
Biosynthesis
Molecular mass
Metabolites
sulforafan
isothiocyanic acid
Eukaryota
Catalase
Ascorbic Acid
Superoxide Dismutase
Glutathione
Toxicity
Chemical reactions

Cite this

Dinkova-Kostova, A. T. (2008). The isothiocyanate sulforaphane induces the phase 2 response by signaling of the Keap1-Nrf2-are pathway: Implications for dietary protection against cancer. In Y-J. Surh, Z. Dong, E. Cadenas, & L. Packer (Eds.), Dietary Modulation of Cell Signaling Pathways (1 ed., pp. 205-227). CRC Press.
Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T. / The isothiocyanate sulforaphane induces the phase 2 response by signaling of the Keap1-Nrf2-are pathway : Implications for dietary protection against cancer. Dietary Modulation of Cell Signaling Pathways. editor / Young-Joon Surh ; Zigang Dong ; Enrique Cadenas ; Lester Packer. 1. ed. CRC Press, 2008. pp. 205-227
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Dinkova-Kostova, AT 2008, The isothiocyanate sulforaphane induces the phase 2 response by signaling of the Keap1-Nrf2-are pathway: Implications for dietary protection against cancer. in Y-J Surh, Z Dong, E Cadenas & L Packer (eds), Dietary Modulation of Cell Signaling Pathways. 1 edn, CRC Press, pp. 205-227.

The isothiocyanate sulforaphane induces the phase 2 response by signaling of the Keap1-Nrf2-are pathway : Implications for dietary protection against cancer. / Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

Dietary Modulation of Cell Signaling Pathways. ed. / Young-Joon Surh; Zigang Dong; Enrique Cadenas; Lester Packer. 1. ed. CRC Press, 2008. p. 205-227.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Dinkova-Kostova AT. The isothiocyanate sulforaphane induces the phase 2 response by signaling of the Keap1-Nrf2-are pathway: Implications for dietary protection against cancer. In Surh Y-J, Dong Z, Cadenas E, Packer L, editors, Dietary Modulation of Cell Signaling Pathways. 1 ed. CRC Press. 2008. p. 205-227