The last-born daughter cell contributes to division orientation of Drosophila larval neuroblasts

Nicolas Loyer, Jens Januschke (Lead / Corresponding author)

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Abstract

Controlling the orientation of cell division is important in the context of cell fate choices and tissue morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms providing the required positional information remain incompletely understood. Here we use stem cells of the Drosophila larval brain that stably maintain their axis of polarity and division between cell cycles to identify cues that orient cell division. Using live cell imaging of cultured brains, laser ablation and genetics, we reveal that division axis maintenance relies on their last-born daughter cell. We propose that, in addition to known intrinsic cues, stem cells in the developing fly brain are polarized by an extrinsic signal. We further find that division axis maintenance allows neuroblasts to maximize their contact area with glial cells known to provide protective and proliferative signals to neuroblasts.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3745
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalNature Communications
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2018

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neuroblasts
Drosophila
Cell Division
division
brain
Cues
cell division
Brain
Stem Cells
stem cells
Cells
Maintenance
cues
Stem cells
maintenance
Laser Therapy
cells
Morphogenesis
Neuroimaging
Neuroglia

Cite this

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abstract = "Controlling the orientation of cell division is important in the context of cell fate choices and tissue morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms providing the required positional information remain incompletely understood. Here we use stem cells of the Drosophila larval brain that stably maintain their axis of polarity and division between cell cycles to identify cues that orient cell division. Using live cell imaging of cultured brains, laser ablation and genetics, we reveal that division axis maintenance relies on their last-born daughter cell. We propose that, in addition to known intrinsic cues, stem cells in the developing fly brain are polarized by an extrinsic signal. We further find that division axis maintenance allows neuroblasts to maximize their contact area with glial cells known to provide protective and proliferative signals to neuroblasts.",
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