The Link Between Personal Self-Control and Dieting Intent is not accounted for by Body Dissatisfaction or Dieting Success Perceptions

Ayoub Bouguettaya, Richard Moulding, Ross King, Ana-Maria Bliuc, Joanna Doley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary restraint is associated with a number of health risks, especially in young women. Research has shown that dispositional self-control negatively predicts dieting behaviour. However, it is possible that empirical findings regarding this relationship have been confounded by a number of related variables, such as prior dieting successand body dissatisfaction. This study, therefore, aimed to clarify the relationship between self-control and dieting intent by controlling for these pertinent variables. We also investigated how individuals’ self-control might relate to expectations of dieting success, in an online sample of female dieters from the USA and the UK (N = 381, Mage = 26.00 years, SD = 5.20) who completed self-report measuresonline. Even when controlling for all forms of body dissatisfactionanddieting successperceptions, self-control related to dieting intentions. These findings provide further evidence that self-control is a key variable that predicts dieting intent, regardless of body dissatisfaction and dieting success beliefs
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages22
JournalPsyArXiv
VolumePREPRINT
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Self-control
  • Dietary restriction
  • Body dissatisfaction
  • Body image

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