The Living Wage

An economic geography based explanation for a policy for equality

Carlo J. Morelli (Lead / Corresponding author), Paul T. Seaman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    This article examines the theoretical underpinning of living wage campaigns. The article uses evidence, derived from the UK Quarterly Labour Force Survey from 2005 to 2008, to examine the extent to which a living wage will address low pay within the labour force. We highlight the greater incidence of low pay within the private sector and then focus upon the public sector where the living wage demand has had most impact. The article builds upon the results from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey with analysis of the British Household Panel Survey in 2007 in order to examine the impact that the introduction of a living wage, within the public sector, would have in reducing household inequality.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages17
    JournalSocial Policy and Society
    Volume15
    Early online date22 Sep 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    economic geography
    equality
    wage
    labor statistics
    public sector
    labor force
    private sector
    incidence
    campaign
    demand
    evidence

    Keywords

    • Living wage
    • low pay
    • inequality
    • public sector
    • BHPS
    • gender
    • young workers

    Cite this

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