The needs of carers who push wheelchairs

Jessie Roberts, Hannah Young, Ken Andrew, Anne McAlpine, James Hogg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose-The purpose of this paper is to establish the outcome of wheelchair prescription procedures for carers supporting a wheelchair user with special reference to their health and well-Being. Design/methodology/approach-A postal questionnaire was used in conjunction with analysis of policy and practice documents in wheelchair prescription and carer's needs. Findings-The majority of carers reported a wide range of health problems. A relationship between wheel chair type and reported carer pain was noted. Only a minority of carers considered that they had received an adequate carer's assessment, and few had received training in wheel chair management; such training where it had been carried out, led to reduced reports of pain. Research limitations/implications- The study invites more detailed analysis of both the conditions under which wheelchair prescribing takes place and the impact of assessment and training on carer's health. The study is based on a relatively small, local sample and a more extensive study is called for. Practical implications-Procedures for prescription of wheelchairs should be reviewed and steps taken to ensure that adequate consideration is given to the health needs of carers and the circumstances under which they will push the wheelchair. Social implications-More thoughtful prescription of wheelchairs will lead to increased health of carers improving their quality of life and reduce demands on health services and the accompanying risk to their capacity to carry on caring. Originality/value-The study addresses a neglected topic, which clearly identifies the consequences of inadequate prescription of wheelchairs for the health of carers, a topic generally neglected in the literature.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)23-34
    Number of pages12
    JournalInternational Journal of Integrated Care
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Wheelchairs
    Caregivers
    medication
    health
    Prescriptions
    Health
    pain
    quality of life
    health service
    Pain
    well-being
    minority
    Policy Making
    questionnaire
    methodology
    Health Services
    management
    Quality of Life
    Values

    Keywords

    • carer assessment
    • carer health
    • carer training
    • Carers
    • Wheelchair prescription
    • Wheelchairs

    Cite this

    Roberts, Jessie ; Young, Hannah ; Andrew, Ken ; McAlpine, Anne ; Hogg, James. / The needs of carers who push wheelchairs. In: International Journal of Integrated Care. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 23-34.
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    The needs of carers who push wheelchairs. / Roberts, Jessie; Young, Hannah; Andrew, Ken; McAlpine, Anne; Hogg, James.

    In: International Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2012, p. 23-34.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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