The Relationship between Existential Anxiety, Political Efficacy, Extrinsic Religiosity and Support for Violent Extremism in Indonesia

Muhammad Iqbal (Lead / Corresponding author), Kerry S. O’Brien (Lead / Corresponding author), Ana Maria Bliuc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
111 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Young people’s involvement in violent extremism remains a concern in many countries, including Indonesia. This study examined direct and indirect relationships between indicators of existential anxiety, political efficacy, extrinsic religiosity, and support for violent extremism. Two hundred and ten young Indonesians were recruited to the study and all completed an anonymous online survey containing the measures of interest. The findings suggest that indicators of existential anxiety are related to greater support for violent extremism, but this relationship may be dependent on perceptions of political efficacy and religious orientation. Future research could explore whether support for violent extremism can be reduced by enhancing young people’s sense of control and political efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalStudies in Conflict and Terrorism
Early online date20 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Feb 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Safety Research
  • Political Science and International Relations

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