The Representation of Political and Economic Elites in the Russian Federation Council.

Cameron Ross, Rostislav Turovsky

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Today's Russian Federation Council, the upper chamber of the bicameral parliament, effectively represents the federal government in the regions rather than providing the regions representation in federal policy-making. The system of choosing members has evolved considerably over time, from direct elections in the early to mid-1990s, to appointments today by the regional executive and legislative branches. In practice, the appointment process is neither democratic, nor representative, instead giving strong benefits to the ruling United Russia party, whose members dominate the chamber. Businesspeople make up a third of the members, but Russia's largest energy and metals companies do not see the rubber stamp body as a way to influence policy-making
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)59-88
    Number of pages29
    JournalDemokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization
    Volume21
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    economic elite
    political elite
    policy making
    Russia
    chamber
    election
    rubber
    economics
    direct election
    party member
    federal policy
    Federal Government
    parliament
    metal
    energy
    federal government
    ruling

    Cite this

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    title = "The Representation of Political and Economic Elites in the Russian Federation Council.",
    abstract = "Today's Russian Federation Council, the upper chamber of the bicameral parliament, effectively represents the federal government in the regions rather than providing the regions representation in federal policy-making. The system of choosing members has evolved considerably over time, from direct elections in the early to mid-1990s, to appointments today by the regional executive and legislative branches. In practice, the appointment process is neither democratic, nor representative, instead giving strong benefits to the ruling United Russia party, whose members dominate the chamber. Businesspeople make up a third of the members, but Russia's largest energy and metals companies do not see the rubber stamp body as a way to influence policy-making",
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    The Representation of Political and Economic Elites in the Russian Federation Council. / Ross, Cameron; Turovsky, Rostislav.

    In: Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2013, p. 59-88.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The Representation of Political and Economic Elites in the Russian Federation Council.

    AU - Ross, Cameron

    AU - Turovsky, Rostislav

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Today's Russian Federation Council, the upper chamber of the bicameral parliament, effectively represents the federal government in the regions rather than providing the regions representation in federal policy-making. The system of choosing members has evolved considerably over time, from direct elections in the early to mid-1990s, to appointments today by the regional executive and legislative branches. In practice, the appointment process is neither democratic, nor representative, instead giving strong benefits to the ruling United Russia party, whose members dominate the chamber. Businesspeople make up a third of the members, but Russia's largest energy and metals companies do not see the rubber stamp body as a way to influence policy-making

    AB - Today's Russian Federation Council, the upper chamber of the bicameral parliament, effectively represents the federal government in the regions rather than providing the regions representation in federal policy-making. The system of choosing members has evolved considerably over time, from direct elections in the early to mid-1990s, to appointments today by the regional executive and legislative branches. In practice, the appointment process is neither democratic, nor representative, instead giving strong benefits to the ruling United Russia party, whose members dominate the chamber. Businesspeople make up a third of the members, but Russia's largest energy and metals companies do not see the rubber stamp body as a way to influence policy-making

    M3 - Article

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    JO - Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization

    JF - Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization

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