The Right to Vote

Constitutive Referendums and Regional Citizenship

Dejan Stjepanović (Lead / Corresponding author), Stephen Tierney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article analyses cases in which regional citizenship is an essential part of constitutional architecture either in the form of peace agreement or federal/autonomy settlement. Apart from offering a characterisation of regional citizenships, the article argues that the franchise and formal (sub-state) regional citizenry should be more closely corresponding in cases where regional citizenship forms an indispensable part of the constitutional arrangement. Importantly, while referring to some of the more complex and (what is perceived in the literature as) unusual cases, the article questions the established citizenship hierarchy where regional citizenship is considered to be derivative of national (state–level) citizenship.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)264-277
Number of pages14
JournalEthnopolitics
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Mar 2019

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right to vote
referendum
citizenship
Citizenship
Referendum
peace
autonomy

Cite this

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The Right to Vote : Constitutive Referendums and Regional Citizenship. / Stjepanović, Dejan (Lead / Corresponding author); Tierney, Stephen.

In: Ethnopolitics, Vol. 18, No. 3, 06.03.2019, p. 264-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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