The structure, biosynthesis and function of GPI membrane anchors

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchors are present in organisms at most stages of eukaryotic evolution, including protozoa, yeast, slime moulds, invertebrates and vertebrates, and are found on a diverse range of proteins. They are primarily responsible for the anchoring of cell-surface proteins in the plasma membrane (or in some cases to the topologically equivalent lumenal surface of secretory vesicles) and may be considered as an alternative to the hydrophobic transmembrane polypeptide anchor of type-1 integral membrane proteins (Fig. 1).
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationMolecular mechanisms of signalling and membrane transport
    EditorsKarel W. A. Wirtz
    Place of PublicationBerlin
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages233-245
    Number of pages13
    ISBN (Print)9783642645594, 3540628916
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997
    EventNATO Study Institute on Molecular Mechanisms of Signalling and Targeting Conference - Spetsai, Greece
    Duration: 18 Aug 199630 Aug 1996
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/46516267

    Publication series

    NameNATO ASI series. Series H: Cell biology
    PublisherSpringer
    Volume101

    Conference

    ConferenceNATO Study Institute on Molecular Mechanisms of Signalling and Targeting Conference
    CountryGreece
    CitySpetsai
    Period18/08/9630/08/96
    Internet address

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