The use of smart glasses for lecture comprehension by deaf and hard of hearing students

Ashley Miller, Joan Malasig, Brenda Castro, Vicki Hanson, Hugo Nicolau, Alessandra Brandão

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

5 Citations (Scopus)
116 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Deaf and hard of hearing students must constantly switch between several visual sources to gather all necessary information during a classroom lecture (e.g., instructor, slides, sign language interpreter or captioning). Using smart glasses, this research tested a potential means to reduce the effects of visual field switches, proposing that consolidating sources into a single display may improve lecture comprehension. Results showed no statistically significant comprehension improvements with the glasses, but interviews indicated that participants found it easier to follow the lecture with glasses and saw the potential for them in the classroom. Future work highlights priorities for smart glasses consideration and new research directions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1909-1915
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 6 May 2017
EventCHI 2017 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Colorado Convention Center, Denver, United States
Duration: 6 May 201711 May 2017
https://chi2017.acm.org/
https://chi2017.acm.org/

Conference

ConferenceCHI 2017 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleCHI 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period6/05/1711/05/17
Internet address

Keywords

  • Deaf
  • education
  • accessibility
  • American Sign Language (ASL)
  • multimedia

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    Miller, A., Malasig, J., Castro, B., Hanson, V., Nicolau, H., & Brandão, A. (2017). The use of smart glasses for lecture comprehension by deaf and hard of hearing students. 1909-1915. Paper presented at CHI 2017 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, United States.