Thermomorphogenesis goes like clockwork: how the circadian clock fine-tunes temperature responses through competing transcriptional repressors

Martin Balcerowicz (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

Like many other organisms, plants have an endogenous circadian clock that generates rhythmic outputs with c. 24-h periods, ensuring that developmental and physiological processes occur at an optimal time of day. At the core of the plant circadian clock is an intricate network of transcriptional activators and repressors arranged in interconnected feedback loops (Creux & Harmer, 2019). This central oscillator does not run in isolation but uses environmental signals such as light and temperature to adjust its phase. Simultaneously, the central oscillator gates processes such as growth and flowering in a light- and temperature-dependent manner. But despite advances made in recent years, our understanding of how the central oscillator perceives and relays temperature signals into output signalling pathways is still limited (for a recent review, see Gil & Park, 2019). In a recent article published in New Phytologist, Li et al. (2022; doi: 10.1111/nph.18442) reveal that competition between the two transcriptional repressors CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1) and REVEILLE 5 (RVE5), central components of the Arabidopsis circadian clock, helps tune gene expression at high ambient temperature.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages3
JournalNew Phytologist
Early online date11 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • circadian clock
  • temperature responses
  • thermomorphogenesis
  • transcription
  • transcription factors

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